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chloride-active fluxes

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001455
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...), flux removal techniques, and postbraze heat treatment processes. It concludes with information on the safety precautions to be followed during the brazing process. aluminum alloys brazing chloride-active fluxes dip brazing fluoride-active fluxes flux removal techniques fluxless vacuum...
Book Chapter

By Daryl D. Peter
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001388
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... with this copper-zinc filler metal. Fluxes An adequate fluxing environment is needed to ensure good flow and penetration of the brazing alloy in molten-salt-bath dip brazing. When brazing is done in a neutral flux chloride salt bath, an active flux is usually applied to the assemblies before brazing...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005300
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... inclusions (see the article “Copper and Copper Alloy Castings” in this Volume) Fluxing of zinc alloys with chloride-containing fluxes that form fluid slag covers, which can be used to minimize melt loss if they are carefully skimmed from the melt before pouring (see the article “Zinc and Zinc Alloy...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001459
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... the melting temperature (for example, 40Sn-40Pb-20In and 70Sn-18Pb-12In). Indium also improves ductility and oxidation resistance. Indium-containing alloys have poor corrosion resistance in the presence of halide ions, such as those used for some activators in flux chemistries. The alloys 52In-48Sn and 97In...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003686
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... atm total pressure and an activity of aluminum equal to 0.01 at the substrate surface. Figure 7 ( Ref 17 ) shows the model for NaX and NH 4 X activated packs where X = F, Cl, Br, or I. The diffusion direction for each species in the depletion zone is obtained by computing the instantaneous fluxes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003593
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... have been used with fused carbonate melts, fused chloride melts, and for oxyfluoride melts ( Ref 7 ), and they could be developed for other fused salt systems. Fig. 2 Experimental electrochemical reference electrodes to simultaneously measure sodium and oxygen activities and thereby, melt...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003210
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... applications and, therefore, require no alloying elements to serve as fluxing agents. The third group of alloys, which is probably the most widely used, is based on the copper-silver binary eutectic system that is modified by substantial additions of zinc and cadmium (both providing fluxing activity...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... are referred to as a “nonactivated,” or type R, grade. The addition of an activator to rosin fluxes increases their chemical activity. Activators can be organic halogenated compounds, such as amine hydrohalides that contain chloride, fluoride, or bromide ion groups or “halide-free” activators, such as oleic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Activated rosin fluxes were developed to provide more chemically active fluxes for mass-produced electronics, such as packaged components. Most mass-produced electronics are manufactured using RMA fluxes. The use of chlorides in these fluxes requires effective cleaning after soldering to prevent corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001492
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... to prevent crevices that may generate crevice corrosion, especially when the environment has chloride ions in solution. The flux should be easily removed to avoid residues that can accelerate the corrosion rate in the joint. Electronic Packaging Filler metal compositions and forms for soldering have...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005307
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
.... Equations 2 and 3 show how the flux dissolves iron oxide and how elemental iron is freed both to alloy with zinc (desirable) and to form dross (undesirable). When fresh flux containing the active ingredient NH 4 Cl is added to partially spent flux, the high-melting viscous basic zinc chlorides (shown...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006529
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... (in a presence of a “getter,” see ‘Vacuum Brazing’ in this article). Fluxes can be corrosive or noncorrosive. Corrosive Aluminum-Brazing Fluxes Corrosive aluminum-brazing fluxes are mixtures of inorganic chloride and fluoride salts supplied in powder and dispensable paste form. Powder flux is applied...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... be given due consideration. Halide-Induced Corrosion Many types of solder fluxes contain halides. Frequently, the halide constituent is the chloride ion, but in some solder-flux formulations, bromide and fluoride ions may be present alone or in combination with chloride ions. Of course, solder flux...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001272
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... have been tried with success. Nickel, vanadium, antimony, titanium, and rare earth metals are known to produce positive results under some circumstances. An aluminum concentration less than 0.01% is generally maintained in the zinc bath when a preflux and/or a bath flux are used. The high chloride...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003831
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... be chemically very active to accomplish the cleaning action. Most of the fluxes are chloride- or fluoride-base compounds. These compounds dissociate at the soldering temperature, react with the metal surface, and help in cleaning the surface by reducing the surface oxides. As a result, most of the corrosion...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001293
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Schematic diagrams of the fluxes of the major diffusing gaseous species in aluminizing packs activated with (a) NH 4 X ( X = Cl, Br, or I), (b) NH 4 F, and (c) NaCl. Source: Ref 20 , 21 Diffusion of the gaseous halides takes place across an aluminum-depleted zone which forms as a result...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0004050
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... may be greatly increased if molten chlorides are formed, which may cause fluxing of oxide scales. Fig. 1 Various types of high-temperature corrosion attack as a function of temperature for (a) chromia-forming alloys and (b) alumina-forming alloys. Corrosion rates are given in arbitrary units...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001460
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... 5 ). These alloys are prone to moderate oxidation in both the liquid and solid states, and they exhibit some difficulty in wetting because of limited flux activity at the lower working temperatures. These alloys have good mechanical properties and are used very successfully in a number of electronic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006535
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
.... Treatment with salt fluxes or active fluxing gases changes the interfacial relationship of included particles with the melt so that gravitational separation is facilitated. Fluxing with argon, nitrogen, and/or other gases results in flotation of entrained matter, while dissolved hydrogen is reduced...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001454
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...-purpose, low-temperature flux used with all coppers and copper alloys, except those with high levels of aluminum. Types FB3-C and FB3-D have higher active temperature ranges, respectively, up to 1205 °C (2200 °F). These fluxes can be used with any filler metal that is appropriate from Table 1 . Other...