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chip formation

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Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... the mechanics of the machining process, and presents the principles of the orthogonal cutting model. The article also analyzes the effect of workpiece properties on chip formation. cutting deformation machining metal deformation orthogonal cutting model shear deformation THE BASIC MECHANISM...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 (a) Tube turning. (b) Chip formation in orthogonal cutting. (c) Chip formation in tube turning More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 2 Schematic of the shear-localized chip formation process that occurs in the high-speed machining of certain materials. 1, undeformed surfaces; 2, part of the catastrophically shear-failed surface separated from the following segment due to intense shear; 3, intense shear band formed due More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 3 Examples of continuous (a) and segmented (b) chip formation. Arrows indicate areas of shear localization. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 4 Effect of cutting speed on chip formation of AISI 4340 steel. (a) Cutting speed of 120 m/min (400 sfm). (b) Cutting speed of 975 m/min (3200 sfm). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 5 Ideal chip formation by a broaching tool More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 2 Mechanisms of chip formation. (a) Discontinuous. (b) Continuous. (c) With build-up edge More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 3 Chip formation process viewed inside a scanning electron microscope. The workpiece is a rectangular plate of high-purity gold that was polished on the sides so that the plastic deformation of the shear process can be readily observed. The boxed area in (a), which is shown at a higher More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 7 Circular force diagram for orthogonal chip formation More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 2 Zones of deformation and friction in chip formation. Source: Ref 2 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006494
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract The horsepower requirements to cut various metal alloys provide an indication of the relative ease and cost of machining, but several other important factors include cutting tool material, chip formation, cutting fluids, cutting tool wear, surface roughness, and surface integrity...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... that the basic mechanism of chip formation is shear deformation, which is controlled by work material properties such as yield strength, shear strength, friction behavior, hardness, and ductility. It describes various chip types, as well as the cutting parameters that influence chip formation. It also...
Book Chapter

Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract This article discusses the mechanics of chip formation and reviews the analytical modeling of the chip formation process by high-speed machining within the framework of continuum mechanics. It examines the relationship between the various high-speed machining parameters. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005519
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Abstract This article begins with information on the fundamentals of chip formation process and general considerations for the modeling and simulation of machining processes. It focuses on smaller-scale models that seek to characterize the workpiece/tool/chip interface and behaviors closely...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... chip formation and distortion due to thermal expansion, cold work, and clamping and provides information on magnesium-matrix composites. The article describes materials, design, and sharpness as factors for selection of tool for machining magnesium. It illustrates turning and boring, planing...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 9 Effect of cutting edge radius on effective rake angle. (a) When the uncut chip thickness is large relative to the edge radius, the positive macroscopic rake angle defines the chip formation. (b) When the edge radius is on the same order as the uncut chip thickness, the effective rake More
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Published: 01 January 2000
pop up around the scratch track, shown in (a), when the indenter is unloaded. (c) Lateral and median cracks after unloading. Load, 90 g. A, extent of median crack; B, extent of lateral crack. (d), (e), and (f), different parts of the same scratch track showing ductile chip formation at low loads More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006306
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... and flank face are the important cutting tool surfaces because they are subject to wear during machining, which affects cutting tool costs for resharpening and replacement and downtime during replacement of the dull cutting tool. Fig. 1 Terminology in orthogonal cutting The chip formation...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 11 Examples of friction contributing to an increase in forces in (a) extrusion, (b) wiredrawing, and (c) machining (chip formation). Source: Ref 81 More
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... the trend of other machine tools, and NC lathes can now be routinely purchased. The primary chip formation processes are listed below, with alternative versions in parentheses. Each process is performed on one or more of the basic machine tools. For example, drilling can be performed on drill presses...