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cathodic reactions

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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 1 Cathodic reactions in anaerobic corrosion. To escape the metal surface, atomic hydrogen must either enter the metal matrix or form molecular hydrogen, which can escape into solution. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 19 Effect of various cathodic reactions on the corrosion current and potential for a metal capable of undergoing an active-passive transition More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003584
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... transfer taking place at the electrode interface within the double layer and of mass transport at the vicinity of the electrode surface are discussed. The article describes the corrosion processes, which involve anodic and cathodic reactions at specific electrode sites. Some experimental methods...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003579
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... and the Nernst equation. It describes galvanic cell reactions and corrosion reactions in an aqueous solution in an electrochemical cell. The article explores the most common cathodic reactions encountered in metallic corrosion in aqueous systems. The reactions included are proton reduction, water reduction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003578
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Electrochemical, or electrode, reactions occur with charge transfer between neutral or ionic reactants and a conducting material called the electrode. This article discusses cathodic reactions that result in reduction and anodic reactions that result in oxidation. It reviews...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
.... A corrosion process can be controlled by the electronic conductivity of passive films when the cathodic reaction occurs on the surface of the film and by activation control of corrosion. Passivation becomes thermodynamically possible when the corrosion potential exceeds the potential corresponding...
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Published: 01 January 2005
) with a curve for the applicable cathodic reaction (one of the representative dashed lines) determines the potential to which the aluminum is polarized, either by cathodic reaction on the aluminum itself or on another metal electrically connected to it. The potential to which the aluminum is polarized More
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Published: 15 June 2019
) with a curve for the applicable cathodic reaction (one of the representative dashed lines) determines the potential to which the aluminum is polarized, either by cathodic reaction on the aluminum itself or on another metal electrically connected to it. The potential to which the aluminum is polarized More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003604
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
..., and electrochemical refining, that consume energy from external sources. Each of these processes consists of an electrochemical cell with an anode, cathode, and conductive medium or electrolyte. Each of these processes involves electrochemical oxidation and reduction reactions. The purpose of this introduction...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Galvanic cells. (a) Schematic illustrating the short-circuit galvanic cell that exists during corrosion. (b) The coupling of an anodic reaction with two distinct cathodic reactions. The relative anodic ( A a ) and cathodic ( A c ) areas of the corroding surface are also illustrated. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003709
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... the cathode in an electric field. Corrosion In its broadest sense, corrosion is the deterioration of a metallic or nonmetallic material by reaction with its environment involving processes other than strictly mechanical or thermal processes. Applied to metallic materials, corrosion is the deterioration...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 25 Schematic polarization curves for a charge-transfer-controlled anodic reaction and a mass-transport-controlled cathodic reaction More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Application of mixed-potential theory showing the electrochemical potential-current relationship for a corroding system consisting of a single charge-transfer-controlled cathodic reaction and charge-transfer-controlled anodic electrochemical reaction. β c and β a are Tafel slopes More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 2 Application of mixed-potential theory showing the electrochemical potential-current relationship for a corroding system consisting of a mass-transport-controlled cathodic reaction and a charge-transfer-controlled anodic reaction. As the fluid velocity increases from 1 to 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 Reaction zone in the bottom cathode lining. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Cathodic electrocleaning. Reaction of electrons with positively charged hydrogen ions results in liberation of hydrogen gas. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 3 Potential versus log current plot relating overpotential to potential scale for anodic and cathodic reactions. M is a metal, and n is a positive integer. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003715
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... electrodes. The processes governing corrosion: These are electrode processes, involving oxidation and reduction reactions (or anodic or cathodic reactions). The corroding system does not produce any net charge and, thus, the electrons produced by the electrochemical oxidation of the metal (the anodic...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003549
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...: the oxidation of zinc and the reduction of hydrogen ions: (Eq 3) Oxidation (anodic reaction) Zn  → Zn 2 + + 2 e (Eq 4) Reduction (cathodic reaction)  2 H + + 2 e → H 2 An oxidation or anodic reaction is indicated by an increase in valence or a release...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005683
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... require unbound oxygen.) The reduction (cathodic) reactions consume the electrons liberated by the oxidation reactions. The two most common cathodic reactions in aqueous electrolytes, such as human body fluids, are reduction of dissolved oxygen and reduction of hydrogen ions. Variations in the type...