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carcinogenicity

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005665
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... aspects of ion toxicity. These include ion concentration and accumulation in organisms, reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, and carcinogenicity stimulated by the corrosion process and toxic ions release. biocompatibility carcinogenicity corrosion corrosion resistance immunogenicity...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005666
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
..., namely, neuropathic effects, hypersensitivity effects, carcinogenicity, and general toxicity. biologic aspects carcinogenicity cobalt alloys debris-induced systemic effects hypersensitivity implant debris local inflammation local osteolysis neuoropathic effects orthopedic implants...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
..., and carcinogenicity of metal compounds. It discusses some commonly used chelating agents for treating metal intoxication, and clinical effectiveness in treating poisoning by different metals. The metals discussed are grouped into four categories: (1) major toxic metals with multiple effects, including arsenic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
..., transport, and installation. Coal Tar Cutbacks As with asphalts, a coal tar cutback consists of coal tar pitch dissolved in a solvent blend. However, the coal tar constituent in hot-applied coal tars, coal tar pitches, and cold-applied coal tar cutbacks is known to be carcinogenic. As a consequence...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005679
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
...</xref>) Table 1 List of ISO Standards for Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices ( Ref 1 ) Reference Title ISO 10993-1 Guidance on selection of tests ISO 10993-2 Animal welfare requirements ISO 10993-3 Test for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity ISO 10993-4...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003050
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... and glass industries. For instance, silica has been classified as a possible carcinogen. For respirable silica dust (≤0.10 μm), OSHA has set the permissible exposure limits as follows: Substance Exposure limit, mg/m 3 Quartz 0.1 Cristobalite 0.05 Tridymite 0.05 Tripoli 0.1...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001275
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... that “Chromate salts are suspected human carcinogens producing tumors of the lungs, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus” ( Ref 21 ). This list indicates that some type of mutational data was reported for all chromium compounds. Hexavalent chromium compounds appear to be the most severe; most are designated...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0005650
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Hygiene 4. Employee health and exposure Personal protective equipment Monitoring of exposure levels Medical evaluations Additional protections for employees working with particularly hazardous substances (carcinogens, toxins) 5. Disposal of hazardous materials Etchants...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005667
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... in increased brittleness and discoloration. Lower-temperature (30 to 50 °C, or 86 to 122 °F) sterilization processes, such as using ethylene oxide gas, are widely used. Ethylene oxide sterilizes through chemically altering the nucleic acids of microbial cells and is a potential carcinogen to human cells, so...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003364
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... has been taken off the market because of the high free methylene dianiline (MDA) content in the product. The MDA is a suspected carcinogen. Another approach to processible BMI resin via a Michael addition chain extension is the reaction of BMI, or a low-melting mixture of BMIs, with aminobenzoic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005739
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
..., in which the chromium is in the hexavalent state, with hexavalent chromium (hex-Cr) being a known carcinogen. During the plating operation, a hex-Cr mist enters the air, and it must be captured and sent through scrubbers to eliminate the potential of releasing the hex-Cr mist into the environment. Waste...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001224
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... and potentially carcinogenic and have been identified as causes of ozone depletion. Most emulsions are now based on a “mineral spirits” derivative, a hydrocarbon mixture with a relatively high boiling point (93 to 150 °C, or 200 to 300 °F). Compositions, operating temperatures, and production applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... be considered before a direct correlation is assumed. Neoplastic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals in the body are frequently a response to long-term exposures to low levels of chemicals in the body, and any determination of these effects requires long-term epidemiological studies to confirm a direct...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004164
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... because of the potential of forming nitrosamines (a potential carcinogen). To avoid exposure to the consumer, nitrite has traditionally been used only in heavy-duty fleet coolant applications. Antifoam Antifoam is added to the coolant to control (minimize the amount and speed up the break time...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006027
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... (yellowish), depending on its thickness. Corrosion protection provided by these coatings increases with color (thickness). Chromate-Free Conversion Coatings Because hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) is a carcinogen and toxin, there has been an attempt to replace chromate-containing products with safer...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005652
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... with the prostheses but that other factors, such as drug therapies used, should also be considered before a direct correlation is assumed. Neoplastic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals in the body are frequently a response to long-term exposures to low levels of chemicals in the body, and any determination...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... are especially effective in increasing the toughness of WC-Co cemented carbides without decreasing their hardness. Low and cobalt-free alloys were developed due to the high cost and potential carcinogenicity of cobalt. Nickel and iron additions are used for corrosion resistance and high wear resistance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006413
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... as LCCPs). In 1985, a study from the U.S. National Toxicological Program (NTP) provided evidence for carcinogenic effects with male mice treated with the C23, containing 43% chlorinated paraffin. In addition, NTP found that the C12 60% chlorinated paraffin was also a suspect carcinogen. In 2008...