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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 18 Burr height in shear slitting. (a) Plot of burr heights from simulation for various rake and cant angles. (b) Comparison of burr heights obtained from simulation with experimentally observed burr heights for various cant angles More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 17 Typical profiles for (a) burr grinding and (b) tungsten inert gas dressing of weld toe More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 34 Edge with burr removed More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 35 Rounded edge after burr removal More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Effect of clearance on burr development in blanking of steel sheet More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Edge characteristics (burr height, hole-size deviation, burnish depth, and rollover depth) in the piercing of low-carbon steel of different hardnesses with various punch-to-die clearances. Curves are for the AISI tempers shown, corresponding to the following HRB hardness limits: No. 1, 98 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Burr (exaggerated) produced along the edges of a blanked lamination More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 15 Die roll and burr in fine-blanked parts. R , corner radius; α, corner angle; a , die roll width; b , die roll height; c , burr height; d , burr width; S , material thickness. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 10 Workpiece after face milling. Burr formation was observed at the cutting edge and the side and face of the exit. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 11 Strain-rate distribution at exit burr for (a) sharp tool and (b) worn tool ( v = 0.4 mm) of the Clapp-Dico cutter. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 12 Comparison of burr area in relation to flank wear width ( v ) between Clapp-Dico tool (axial rake angle = 0°) and Kennametal high-shear tool (axial rake angle = 20°). The points on the left indicate sharp tools, and the points on the right indicate worn tools. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 3 Burr height as a function of the cutting angle, showing insensitivity to blade sharpness at 20° cutting angle. The legend indicates five blade sharpnesses ( r ). More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4 Burr height dependence with clearance, establishing a critical clearance for four alloy thickness combinations More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 14 (a) Simulated and (b) experimentally observed burr height as functions of the clearance for various radii for 0° cutting angle More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15 (a) Simulated and (b) experimental burr heights as functions of cutting angles for various blade radii for 5% clearance More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 16 Simulated burr height as a function of the cutting angle at 5% clearance and 0.025 mm blade radius More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 19 Comparison of burr heights for 5182-H19 and 6022-T4 aluminum alloys for 0° rake angle More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001024
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001029
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005528
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses a set of experimental and computational studies aimed at understanding the effect of various processing parameters on the extent of burr and other defect formation during sheet edge-shearing and slitting processes. It describes the development...