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bronzes

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006281
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract Bronzes generally are used to describe many different copper-base alloys in which the major alloying addition is neither zinc nor nickel. They are generally classified by their major alloying elements, for example, tin bronzes with phosphorus used as a deoxidizer, aluminum bronzes...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 The attack on bronzes by oils and fats. (a) Fats with three ester linkages are hydrolyzed, producing free fatty acids. R 1 , R 2 , and R 3 are long hydrocarbon chains, typically containing 12, 14, 16, 18, or 20 carbon atoms. (b) The free fatty acids attack copper in the presence More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Different phases in nickel-aluminum bronzes. More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Type III microstructure commonly found in low-lead bronzes and some aluminum-tin bearing alloys. (a) Schematic showing discrete soft particles dispersed in a hard matrix that is bonded to a steel backing. (b) Micrograph of a medium-lead tin bronze in which lead is present in the dark More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Two bronze pieces exhibiting corrosion. (a) A finial, approximately 1300 to 1050 B.C.E. from the Shang dynasty (approximately 1600 to 1050 B.C.E.), China. (b) A closeup of the handle of a ritual food vessel (ding) with cover, approximately 550 to 400 B.C.E. Eastern Zhou dynasty (771 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Bird damage to a 1931 bronze statue located in Kingston, Ontario, that commemorates the 21st Battalion battles in World War I. Courtesy of Pierre Roberge, Royal Military College of Canada. Photograph 2002 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Detail of severe pitting on a child's face in the 1887 bronze statue Stone Age in America by John J. Boyle located in Philadelphia. Courtesy of the Fairmount Park Art Association. Photograph by Franko Khoury © 1983 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Detail of the bronze sculpture of The Thinker by Auguste Rodin (installed outside the Rodin Museum in Philadelphia in 1929) (a) before treatment and (b) after treatment. Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Conservation Department. Photographs 1992 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Schematic diagram of bronze disease on archaeological copper alloys. Adapted from Ref 114 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 6 Scanning electron micrograph of a typical prealloyed water-atomized bronze powder (90%Cu-10%Sn); apparent density 3.4 g/cm 3 . Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 9 Scanning electron micrograph of prealloyed, air-atomized bronze (89%Cu-9%Sn-2%Zn). Original magnification: 165× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 10 Assorted filters made from powder metallurgy bronze. Courtesy of Arrow Pneumatics, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 11 Scanning electron micrograph of a typical diffusion-alloyed bronze powder (90% Cu–10% Su); apparent density 2.6 g/cm 3 . 200× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Example of alpha bronze microstructure produced by sintering 90Cu-10Sn at 830 °C (1530 °F). Etched in FeCl 3 . Original magnification: 200×. Courtesy of SCM Metal Products, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Example of multiphase bronze microstructure produced by sintering 90Cu-10Sn at 770 °C (1420 °F). As-polished. Original magnification: 100×. Courtesy of SCM Metal Products, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Example of bronze powder metallurgy structural parts More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 8 Properties of prealloyed bronze powders. Sintered 30 min at 840 °C (1550 °F) in a dissociated ammonia atmosphere More
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