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brine quenching

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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 1 AISI W1 tool steel austenitized at 800 °C (1475 °F), brine quenched, and tempered 2 h at 150 °C (300 °F). Black rings are hardened zones in 75, 50, and 25 mm (3, 2, and 1 in.) diameter bars. Core hardness decreases with increasing bar diameter (all one-half actual size). (a) Shallow More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 48 AISI W1 (1.05% C), 19 mm (0.75 in.) diam bars, brine quenched. (a) Hardened case microstructure. 64 HRC. Case contains as-quenched martensite and undissolved carbides. 4% picral. (b) 2% nital etch reveals martensite as dark rather than light. (c) Transition zone. 55 HRC. Martensite More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 5 Relation of hardness to brine concentration when still quenching end-quench specimens in a 99 °C (210 °F) brine solution. Numbers above curves indicate distance from quenched end in 1.6 mm ( 1 16 in.). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 34 Relation of hardness to brine concentration when still-quenching, end quench specimens 90 °C (195 °F) brine solution. Number above curves indicate distance from quench end in units of 1/16 in. Adapted from Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8 Comparative case-depth and case-hardness data obtained for liquid carburizing process-control specimens made of three steels. (a) Data are for 11 mm diam by 6.4 mm (0.4375 in. diam by 0.25 in.) specimens carburized 2 h at 855 °C (1575 °F), brine quenched and tempered at 150 °C (300 °F More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 16 Example hardness distribution in eutectoid steel with average hardenability using a warm brine quench. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 10 Tempering characteristics of carbon-tungsten special-purpose tool steels tempered 2 h after being brine quenched More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 558 The heat treatment of this specimen was altered as follows: austenitized at 1205 °C (2200 °F) for 1 h, quench to 870 °C (1600 °F) and hold for 30 min, ice-brine quench, then refrigerate in liquid nitrogen. Fracture appears to have occurred by a combination of transgranular More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 8 Case-hardened layer in W1 tool steel. Specimens were austenitized at 800 °C (1475 °F), brine quenched, and tempered 2 h at 150 °C (300 °F). Black rings are hardened zones. Etched using 50% hot HCl. Approximately 0.5× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 548 Charpy impact fracture in 0.18C-3.85Mo steel after heat treatment in an inert atmosphere at 1200 °C (2190 °F) for 1 h, followed by an ice/10% brine quench. Many quasi-cleavage facets are visible. See Fig. 549 (an enlargement of the area in the rectangle). SEM, 300× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 7 Case-hardened layer in W1 tool steel. Specimens were austenitized at 800 °C (1475 °F), brine quenched, and tempered 2 h at 150 °C (300 °F). Black rings are hardened zones. Etched using 50% hot HCl. Approximately 0.5×. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 114 Example of specimens used in the Shepherd P-F test. The 19-mm ( 3 4 -in.) diam, 100-mm (4-in.) long specimen is shown at the bottom. The test consists of fracturing an austenitized and brine-quenched specimen. Case depth can be observed on the fracture. After fracture grain More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4F
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v4F.a0007001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-450-5
... discussed. The article discusses solute additions and several factors impacting quenching. brine quenching cooling rates heat transfer salt solutions MATERIAL PROPERTIES such as hardness, strength, ductility, and toughness are dependent on the microstructural qualities that are present...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 16 Effect of brine concentration on hardness of end-quench specimens. Numbers indicate 1/16 in. increments from quench end. Note: End-quench specimens were not hardened using the standard Jominy end-quench test; specimens were quenched in still water at 100 °C (210 °F) with only the end More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005972
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... usually quenched in water (brine) or oil. Salt-bath quenching is used for some grades to perform martempering. The increasingly rapid quench rates of modern vacuum furnaces with high-pressure gas quenching allow the quenching of some of these grades, especially for smaller sections. The possibilities...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005862
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
..., on quenching. It also describes various quenching methods for steel induction heat treating, namely, spray quenching, immersion quenching, self or mass quenching, and forced air quenching. The article also reviews quench system design and quenchants and their maintenance. brine quenching induction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001029
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... suited to very low hardenability steels include the hot-brine test and the surface-area-center (SAC) test. Hot-Brine Test In the hot-brine test proposed by Grange, coupons ( Fig. 5 ) are quenched in brine maintained at a series of different temperatures. As shown in Fig. 6 , the resulting...
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Correlation of equivalent cooling rates in the end-quenched hardenability specimen and round bars quenched in oil, water, and brine. Source: Refs 2 , 3 and 4 (Curves for quenching in brine and still water were calculated by J.L Lamont, Iron Age, October 14, 1943; curve for water More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Correlation of equivalent cooling rates in the end-quenched hardenability specimen and round bars quenched in oil, water, and brine. Source: Refs 2 , 3 and 4 (Curves for quenching in brine and still water were calculated by J.L. Lamont, Iron Age, October 14, 1943; curve for water More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 7 Relation of hardness to the distance from the quenched end of specimens quenched in water and brine. Cooling power of brine is greater than water at 80 °C (180 °F). Source: Ref 4 More