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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Smeared surface iron pitting of unalloyed titanium tubing in hot brine service. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 5 Hot-brine hardenability test specimen. (a) Specimen dimensions. (b) Method of locating hardness impressions after heat treatment. Dimensions given in millimeters. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 6 Typical results of the hot-brine hardenability test. Steel composition: 0.18% C, 0.81% Mn, 0.17% Si, and 1.08% Ni. Austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F). Grain size: 5 to 7. RT, room temperature. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 30 Typical results of the hot-brine hardenability test. Steel composition: 0.18% C, 0.81% Mn, 0.17% Si, and 1.08% Ni. Austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F). Grain size: 5 to 7. RT, room temperature. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 5 Relation of hardness to brine concentration when still quenching end-quench specimens in a 99 °C (210 °F) brine solution. Numbers above curves indicate distance from quenched end in 1.6 mm ( 1 16 in.). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 16 Effect of brine concentration on hardness of end-quench specimens. Numbers indicate 1/16 in. increments from quench end. Note: End-quench specimens were not hardened using the standard Jominy end-quench test; specimens were quenched in still water at 100 °C (210 °F) with only the end More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 1 AISI W1 tool steel austenitized at 800 °C (1475 °F), brine quenched, and tempered 2 h at 150 °C (300 °F). Black rings are hardened zones in 75, 50, and 25 mm (3, 2, and 1 in.) diameter bars. Core hardness decreases with increasing bar diameter (all one-half actual size). (a) Shallow More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 48 AISI W1 (1.05% C), 19 mm (0.75 in.) diam bars, brine quenched. (a) Hardened case microstructure. 64 HRC. Case contains as-quenched martensite and undissolved carbides. 4% picral. (b) 2% nital etch reveals martensite as dark rather than light. (c) Transition zone. 55 HRC. Martensite More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Failed brine-heater shell of ASTM A285, grade C, carbon steel. The shell fractured at welded joints because of overstress during normal operation. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 11 Failed brine-heater shell of ASTM A285, grade C carbon steel. The shell fractured at welded joints because of overstress during normal operation. Dimensions in inches More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 34 Relation of hardness to brine concentration when still-quenching, end quench specimens 90 °C (195 °F) brine solution. Number above curves indicate distance from quench end in units of 1/16 in. Adapted from Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 14 Chromatograms for geological brines. (a) Standard 3. (b) Sample A. (c) Sample B More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001029
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... suited to very low hardenability steels include the hot-brine test and the surface-area-center test. The article discusses the effects of varying carbon content as well as the influence of different alloying elements. It includes charts and a table that serve as a general steel hardenability selection...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003699
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... causes of corrosion inhibition in waterfloods: oxygen contamination and acid gases dissolved in the brine. A discussion on the bacteria-induced corrosion is provided. The article also explains various tests available for field corrosion monitoring. It details the methods used to monitor corrosion rates...
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 7 Relation of hardness to the distance from the quenched end of specimens quenched in water and brine. Cooling power of brine is greater than water at 80 °C (180 °F). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Correlation of equivalent cooling rates in the end-quenched hardenability specimen and round bars quenched in oil, water, and brine. Source: Refs 2 , 3 and 4 (Curves for quenching in brine and still water were calculated by J.L Lamont, Iron Age, October 14, 1943; curve for water More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Correlation of equivalent cooling rates in the end-quenched hardenability specimen and round bars quenched in oil, water, and brine. Source: Refs 2 , 3 and 4 (Curves for quenching in brine and still water were calculated by J.L. Lamont, Iron Age, October 14, 1943; curve for water More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 18 Correlation of J ec equivalent cooling rates in the end-quench hardenability specimen and round bars quenched in oil, water, and brine, (a), (c), and (e) Nonscaling austenitizing atmosphere. (b), (d), and (f) Austenitized in air Brine (1), violent agitation Water (2), 60 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8 Comparative case-depth and case-hardness data obtained for liquid carburizing process-control specimens made of three steels. (a) Data are for 11 mm diam by 6.4 mm (0.4375 in. diam by 0.25 in.) specimens carburized 2 h at 855 °C (1575 °F), brine quenched and tempered at 150 °C (300 °F More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 16 Example hardness distribution in eutectoid steel with average hardenability using a warm brine quench. Source: Ref 20 More