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brazed joints

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001478
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of manufacture; and designing so that necessary inspections of the brazed joints can be readily and dependably performed. Inspectable factors include dimensional configuration, cosmetic requirements, and, in most cases, a percentage of the actually brazed joint area. Factors that are usually not inspectable...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006828
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... of the material, joint design, prebraze cleaning, brazing procedures, postbraze cleaning, and quality control. Factors that must be considered include brazeability of the base metals; joint design and fit-up; filler-metal selection; prebraze cleaning; brazing temperature, time, atmosphere, or flux; conditions...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003831
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... Abstract Corrosion is often thought of as rusting, the process of deterioration undergone by a metal when it is exposed to air or water. This article provides the fundamentals of joints corrosion and primarily addresses the various forms of corrosion observed in brazed and soldered joints...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 67 Brazed joints are prone to developing water leaks. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 12 Titanium-to-copper brazed joints made in vacuum at 780 °C (1440 °F) using BAg-18 filler metal. Copper bars 60 × 12.5 × 3.2 mm (2.36 × 0.49 × 0.13 in.); titanium bars 25 × 13 × 1.6 mm (0.98 × 0.51 × 0.06 in.) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 19 Brazed joints of (a) titanium-to-graphite and (b) Ti-6Al-4V-to-alumina failed in the graphite and ceramic bodies. Brazing filler metal is BTi-5. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 37 Macrostructures of brazed joints of a titanium heat exchanger made at 860 °C (1580 °F) using amorphous foil TiBraze590 (Zr-17.6Ti-20Ni-1Hf wt%). Original magnification: 12.5× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 41 Load-displacement diagrams of titanium lap brazed joints made with aluminum-magnesium foils as brazing filler metals. (a) Al-2.5Mg-0.3Cr wt%. (b) Al-4.5Mg-0.4Si wt%, showing improved ductility of joint metal More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 42 Brazed joints of CP titanium made by torch brazing in air with aluminum-base filler metal TiBrazeAl-655 and flux TiBF-19. (a) Titanium-to-titanium. (b) Titanium-to-copper. (c) Titanium-to-stainless steel. Titanium and copper bars 50 × 12.5 × 3.2 mm (1.97 × 0.49 × 0.13 in.); stainless More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 48 Standard testing specimens for testing butt or lap brazed joints according to AWS C3.2M/C3.2:2008 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 38 Titanium fin-plate heat exchanger joints brazed using BTi-5 at 890 °C (1630 °F). The brazed joint exhibits no erosion of titanium fins or plate after brazing. Original magnification: 50× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 36 Honeycomb panel joints brazed using (a) BTi-5 at 890 °C (1630 °F), original magnification: 100×, and (b) TiBraze800 at 830 °C (1530 °F), original magnification: 100×. The BTi-5 exhibits no erosion of the honeycomb plate but partial dissolution of the honeycomb core, while TiBraze800 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 21 Braze joint thermal profile created in copper-to-copper joint assembly heated with a solenoidal coil. The coil is positioned to generate more heat in the thicker cross section, to make both parts reach brazing temperature at the joint at the same time. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 24 Braze joint thermal profile created when the bottom part in Fig. 21 is changed to steel; note that the steel heats faster below the joint area. To braze this joint without overheating the steel, the coupling distance around the steel part should be increased and/or the coil should More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 29 Coil current flow through a brazed joint in a copper inductor. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 15 Configuration of braze joint that allows use of a metal oil seal More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Diffusion process resulting in loss of identity of original brazed joint More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Photomicrograph of the crack repair of a diffusion brazed joint by heat treating of the IN-792 base metal. Sample was etched with Kalling's reagent. 76× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 4 Photomicrograph of a typical brazed joint that was formed using a clad brazing material More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 7 (a) Microstructure of brazed joint of Ti-6Al-4V alloy (titanium grade 5) made using BTi-5 amorphous foil as a filler metal. Original magnification: 500×. (b) Macrostructure with crack propagation in this brazed joint. Original magnification: 100× More