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boron fiber

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003359
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract For the reinforcement of metal-matrix composites, four general classes of materials are commercially available: oxide fibers based primarily on alumina and alumina silica systems, nonoxide systems based on silicon carbide, boron fibers, and carbon fibers. This article discusses the key...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009074
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract This article focuses on the sample preparation methods for titanium honeycomb composites, boron fiber composites, and titanium/polymeric composite hybrids. These include mounting, sectioning, grinding, and polishing. The article also provides information on the sample preparation of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003330
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... provides information on the specimen preparation, instrumentation, and procedures for various mechanical test methods of fiber-reinforced composites. These include the compression test, flexure test, shear test, open hole tension test, and compression after impact test. The article describes three distinct...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003400
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... significant gain or loss of material. The process occurs by oxygen ingress through matrix cracks, followed by reaction of the oxygen with the fibers and the fiber coatings ( Ref 3 , 39 , 40 41 , and 42 ). Commonly, the reactions result in the elimination of the fiber coatings (carbon or boron-nitrogen...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article addresses the types, properties, forms, and applications of fibers that are available for use in fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composites, including glass, graphite, carbon, aramid, boron, silicon carbide, ceramic, continuous oxide and discontinuous oxide fibers. It...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003357
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... nearly stoichiometric. For example, to form the Tyranno SA and Sylramic fiber types, aluminum and boron sintering aids are introduced, respectively, into the fibers prior to pyrolysis in order to facilitate fiber densification during excursions to process temperatures greater than 1700 °C (3100 °F). In...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003374
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... treatment is fairly clear in the case of carbon fibers, but is less clear in the case of boron fibers that are treated chemically to form a boron carbide or boron nitride coating ( Ref 8 ). A useful definition is that a sizing is a deliberate coating of the reinforcement, which may incidentally react...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003352
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... silica fibers. E-glass is commercially available as a boron-containing and a boron-free variant. Owens Corning, PPG, and Vetrotex sell boron-containing E-glass. Owens Corning also sells boron-free E-glass under the trade name Advantex. S-glass is the predominant version of a group of high-strength fibers...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003031
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article discusses the types, properties, and uses of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites, including glass, carbon, aramid, boron, continuous silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide fiber composites. While polyester and vinyl ester resins are the most used matrix materials for...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... Abstract The principal superhard materials are found as phases in the boron-carbon-nitrogen-silicon family of elements. Of these, the superhard materials of commercial interest include silicon nitride (Si3N4), silicon carbide (SiC), boron carbide (B4C), diamond, and cubic boron nitride (CBN...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... 0.7 407 59 Carbon fiber (PAN)   E = 34 × 10 6 psi 1.8 0.064 230 34 14 2 128 19   E = 75 × 10 6 psi … … 520 75 6.9 1.0 … … Carbon fiber (vapor-phase) 1.8 0.064 230 34 … … 128 19 Boron fiber 2.5 0.090 400 58 400 58 160 23 Quartz fiber 2.2 0.079...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003163
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... MMC designation system and also describes the types of continuous fiber aluminum MMCs, including aluminum/boron MMC, aluminum/silicon carbide MMC, aluminum/graphite MMC, and aluminum/alumina MMC. aluminum-matrix composites copper-matrix composites intermetallic-matrix composites magnesium...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... 2 O 3 F 2 General-purpose fibers Boron-containing E-glass 1 , 2 52–56 4–6 12–15 21–23 0.4–4 … 0.2–0.5 … 0–1 Trace … 0.2–0.4 0.2–0.7 Boron-free E-glass 7 59.0 … 12.1 22.6 3.4 … 1.5 … 0.9 … … 0.2 … 8 60.1 … 13.2 22.1 3.1 … 0.5 … 0.6 0.2...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003064
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... carbon fibers has dropped and their mechanical properties have increased. This article begins with an overview of the carbon conversion processes, fiber properties and microstructures, and interfacial bonding and environmental interaction of carbon fibers, followed by a detailed discussion on the various...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005772
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... boriding thermochemical boriding BORIDING, also known as boronizing, is a thermochemical diffusion-based surface-hardening process that can be applied to a wide variety of ferrous, nonferrous, and cermet materials. Boriding is typically performed on metal components as a solution for extending the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
...-reinforced polymeric composites are developed from thermoplastic or thermoset resins combined with either discontinuous or continuous unidirectional fibers or woven fabrics ( Fig. 1 ). Typical reinforcements consist of glass, carbon, or aramid fibers, but other materials, such as boron, ceramic, and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006488
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... technologically mature continuous-fiber MMC is aluminum reinforced with boron filaments (typically coated with B 4 C). Applications for this composite include tubular truss members in the midfuselage structure of the space shuttle orbiter and cold plates in electronic microchip carrier multilayer boards...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003420
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... graphite, silicon carbide (SiC), boron, aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ), and refractory metals. Discontinuous reinforcements consist mainly of SiC in whisker (w) form, particulate (p) types of SiC, Al 2 O 3 , and titanium diboride (TiB 2 ), and short or chopped fibers (c) of Al 2 O 3 or graphite. This...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002478
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... one hand, the matrix may not wet the fiber; on the other, it may dissolve or react to form a compound with the fiber. Aluminum does not wet alumina or graphite, and it is hard to produce void-free composites. By contrast, aluminum reacts with boron and also graphite. Coatings can be used either to...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... International thanks Gerald V. Flanagan, Materials Sciences Corporation for helping with this adaptation. A unidirectional fiber composite (UDC) consists of aligned continuous fibers that are embedded in a matrix ( Fig. 1 ). Fibers currently used are glass, carbon, graphite, and boron; typical matrices are...