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bolt steel

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 4340 steel wing-attachment bolt that cracked along a seam. (a) Bolt showing crack (arrows) along entire length. (b) Branching cracks (arrows) at head-to-shank radius. (c) Head of bolt showing cracking (arrows) about halfway through bolt-head diameter. (d) Section through bolt showing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 AISI type 431 stainless steel T-bolt that failed by SCC. (a) T-bolt showing location of fracture. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Fracture surface of the bolt showing shear lip (arrow A), fine-grain region (arrow B), and oxidized regions (arrows C). (c) Longitudinal section through More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 8 The 4340 steel wing-attachment bolt that cracked along a seam. (a) Bolt showing crack (arrows) along entire length. (b) Branching cracks (arrows) at head-to-shank radius. (c) Head of bolt showing cracking (arrows) approximately halfway through bolt-head diameter. (d) Section through More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 9 The incorrect choice of a carbon steel retaining bolt for a stainless steel spindle resulted in localized galvanic corrosion of the paddle-stirrer assembly ( Fig. 3 ). More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 33 The incorrect choice of a carbon-steel retaining bolt for a stainless-steel spindle resulted in localized galvanic corrosion of the paddle-stirrer assembly (see Fig. 28 ) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002368
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... Abstract This article discusses the effect of thread design, preload, tightening, and mean stress on the fatigue strength of bolt steel. It describes the factors influencing fatigue failures in cold-driven and hot-driven riveted joints. The factors affecting the fatigue resistance of bolted...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15 A 9.5 mm ( 3 8 in.) diameter 8640 steel unthreaded bolt austempered to 44 HRC and bent 90° without cracking exhibits the superiority of a bainitic microstructure at higher (>40 HRC) hardnesses. Courtesy of Applied Process Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Fatigue fracture of a steel bolt. Interpretation of the surface indicates that loading was primarily by unidirectional bending. However, secondary origins (C and D) indicate the possibility that a small reversed bending or backlash may have been present. Many closely spaced origins More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 26 Side views of four types of ASTM A490 high-strength steel bolt tensile specimens. See also Fig. 27 . Left to right: bolts 1, 4, 6, and 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 96 Broken 25-mm (1-in.) diam AISI 1040 steel bolt. (a) Macrograph of fracture surface; corrosion products obscure most of the surface. 2×. Intergranular secondary cracks (b) were observed in the region near the surface of the bolt shown by the arrow in (a). The bolt was not tempered More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 164 River pattern on cleavage fracture surface of low-carbon steel bolt. When a crack crosses a twist boundary, many small parallel cracks may form with cleavage steps between them. These steps run together, forming larger ones and leading to the river patterns characteristic of cleavage More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 16 Production of a 1038 steel blank for a bicycle-pedal bolt in two blows on a cold upsetter. Dimensions given in inches Machine 1 2 in. boltmaking machine Tool material M2 inserts, 62–64 HRC Lubricant Stearate on stock Production rate 4200 pieces/h More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 A noncompatible metal bushing in contact with a stainless steel bolt and other adjacent metal surfaces if left uncorrected may corrode away and weaken the connection. Courtesy of the NRPA NPSI More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 455 Matching fracture surfaces of an AISI 4340 steel helicopter bolt that was broken by notch bending. The fine markings are fibrous tear ridges. Note the very large shear lips. 2.5× (Fig. 455 in printed volume) More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 32 Fatigue fracture of a steel bolt. Interpretation of the surface indicates that loading was primarily by unidirectional bending. However, secondary origins (C and D) indicate the possibility that a small reversed bending or backlash may have been present. Many closely spaced origins More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 41 PH13-8Mo stainless steel aircraft attachment bolt. (a) Photograph of parallel circumferential lines of corrosion on the bolt shank. (b) Close-up view of the fracture surface showing corroded area (areas A and B). Arrows point to a crack-arrest line. (c) Scanning electron microscopy More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 4 Stainless steel bolt before and after tensile test, just before final failure More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 8 (a) Beach marks on a steel bolt. (b) Smooth fatigue portion of fracture profile in a metallographic mount of a steel fastener. Nital etch. (c) Scanning electron microscope image showing fatigue striations More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 10 AISI type 431 stainless steel T-bolt that failed by stress-corrosion cracking. (a) T-bolt showing location of fracture. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Fracture surface of the bolt showing shear lip (arrow A), fine-grained region (arrow B), and oxidized regions (arrows C). (c More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 23 Photo of a 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter 8640 steel unthreaded bolt austempered to 44 HRC and bent 90° without cracking. The bolt exhibits the superiority of a bainitic microstructure at higher (>40 HRC) hardnesses. Courtesy of Applied Process Inc. More