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blisters

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 6 Cathodic blisters around a scribe. The scribe is the anode; the area immediately adjacent to it is the cathode. Courtesy: KTA-Tator, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Dome-shaped projections or blisters in the dry paint film through local loss of adhesion and lifting of the film from the underlying surface. Blisters may contain liquid, vapor, gas, or crystals. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 8 Bubbles within a paint film appear as small blisters. These may be intact or broken (leaving a crater). Can be found in excessively thick paint films, especially if spray applied, and also with roller application. This should not be confused with blistering. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 32 Section through solidified aluminum blisters showing line-shaped oxide skins, metallic aluminum (light), and dark pores. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 35 Large composite blisters More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 Close-up view (stereomicroscope) of fracture through blisters (arrows) in a heat treated aluminum casting. Original magnification: 8├Ś. Blisters found are related to encapsulation of a carbonaceous material, such as a lubricant, during casting. More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 13 Semimet transfer layer cracks and blisters More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 13 Semimet transfer layer cracks and blisters More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 13 Semi-met transfer layer cracks and blisters More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 2 Blistering. (a) Blistering of a gel coat. (b) Blistering beneath a gel coat More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 15 (a) Overview of blistered steel. (b) Close-up view of opened blister cap. Courtesy of K. Tator More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 12 Removal of blister caps and blister liquid is essential when determining the cause of a blister failure. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 35 Osmotic blistering of polyurea over steel/soluble salts More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Blister-formation process initiation and resulting corrosion. Source: K. Tator, KTA-Tator, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 17 Blistering of a pipeline coating from electroosmosis More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Scored block (with blistered coating) on left; smooth-faced on right More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Large water-filled blister on the exterior of a concrete masonry unit wall More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 25 Liquid-filled blister formed within polyvinyl acetate block filler beneath an elastomeric finish More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 26 Blister in Fig. 25 punctured, showing that a large volume of water had collected beneath the elastomeric finish More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 28 Cracks in the acrylic overcoat are visible to the left of the blister. The wrinkled coating is the original elastomeric finish that is failing to the block filler (beneath the wrinkled coating but not visible in the photo). More