1-20 of 270 Search Results for

biological organisms

Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of corrosion standards proposed by the International Standards Organization (ISO). This article focuses on the important variables associated with atmospheric corrosion in marine atmospheres, namely, moisture, temperature, winds, airborne contaminants, alloy content, location, and biological organisms along...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006854
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... biologically relevant materials, molecules, cells, tissues, and biodegradable biomaterials with a prescribed organization to accomplish one or more biological functions. Currently, 3D bioprinting constructs can be classified into two categories: acellular and cellular. This article introduces and discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
.... These organisms include many species of bacteria, algae, and fungi. In all of these environments, the tendency is for microorganisms present in the water to attach to and grow on the immersed surfaces of structural materials, resulting in the formation of a biological film, or biofilm. Larger, macroscopic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006860
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., and biological inertness while having a good UV energy-absorption coefficient. Laser-Induced Forward Transfer Printing Applications As a 3D printing modality, LIFT enables the deposition of spatially controlled biomaterials, contributing to the success of tissue and organ printing. It can be implemented...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005679
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... References References 1. Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices . ISO 10993 series, International Standards Organization ...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005686
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... not be obvious why chemical and material characterization is so important and why it is an essential part of biological evaluation for medical devices, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) harmonized standards clearly link the two together. Parts 18 and 19 are receiving even more emphasis...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of biological fouling organisms take place directly at the metal/water interface where the corrosion occurs, not in the bulk water. This means that the chemical environment in which the corrosion reactions occur in the presence of a micro- or macrofouling film may bear little resemblance to that of the bulk...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005655
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... defined by Williams as “non-viable materials used in a medical device, intended to interact with biological systems” ( Ref 1 ). Ceramics used in such biological applications are commonly referred to as bioceramics. History of Bioceramics Biocompatibility has been defined by Williams as “the ability...
Image
Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 3 (a) Three-dimensional (3D)-printed cardiac microphysical organ-on-a-chip integrated with strain sensor. (Left) Schematics of the device. (Right) Printed sensor that measures the contraction of anisotropic-engineered cardiac tissue, as shown in the graph in the inset. Reprinted from Ref More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...-ground facilities or submerged structures that receive sunlight. For closed systems and buried facilities, microbial metabolism is based on energy derived from oxidation reduction (redox) reactions. Under aerobic conditions, reduction of oxygen to water complements the metabolic oxidation of organic...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001725
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... overview of the as alloys, glasses, ceramics, organics, gases, technique, and to help him decide whether solved rather than becoming an analytical inorganics, and so on. Techniques used pri- the technique might be applicable to his specialist. This Handbook describes modern marily for biological or medical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbiologically influenced corrosion as a basis for discussion on the diagnosis, management, and prevention of biological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It begins with an overview of the scope...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006856
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... ENGINEERING, the regeneration of damaged functional living tissues and organs is a primary aim. The tissue engineering paradigm focuses on creating artificial tissue structures that are used to restore or replace damaged or diseased tissues and organs ( Ref 1 , 2 ). The interconnected porous architectures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article provides a summary of the biocompatibility or biological response of metals, ceramics, and polymers used in medical implants, along with their clinical issues. The polymers include ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, nonresorbable polymer, and resorbable polymers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... become critical factors. Alkyl compounds are lipid soluble and pass readily across biologic membranes unaltered by their surrounding medium. They are only slowly dealkylated or transformed to inorganic salts. Hence, their excretion tends to be slower than inorganic forms, and the pattern of organic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005858
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... national and international organizations and scientific institutions. Biological and Health Effects Biological effects are not necessarily harmful to health. They are the measurable and natural response of the organism to a stimulus or a change in the environment. Many activities produce various...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005675
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
...-ceramics, and their derivatives, that is, inorganic-organic hybrids, in the forms of solid or porous bodies, oxide layers/coatings, and particles with sizes ranging from nanometers to micrometers, or even millimeters. These materials are attractive as biological implants, tissue defect fillers, scaffolds...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006905
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... the creation of hollow structures and complex shapes difficult to produce by removal and molding ( Fig. 1 ). For example, biocompatibility is a concern when considering a metal implant for bone protection. In this case, it does not simply mean the presence or absence of biological harm as a substance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003670
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... ). Fig. 1 Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the water bottom of an offshore oil storage tank In natural conditions, SRB grow in association with other microorganisms and use a range of carboxylic acids and fatty acids, which are common by-products of other micro-organisms. Biological slimes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006891
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... to form artificial organizations. Biological scaffolds are important for tissue engineering and are widely used for clinical treatments. Raw materials, such as cellulose, collagen, and polylactide-glycolic acid copolymer, have been used to print scaffolds. In addition, cells can be “gifted...