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binary phase diagram

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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 10 Partial binary phase diagram depicting the ω phase and β′ (β-phase separation) More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 15 Portion of a binary phase diagram containing a two-phase liquid-plus-solid field illustrating (a) application of the lever rule to (b) equilibrium freezing, (c) nonequilibrium freezing, and (d) heating of a homogenized sample. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 1 Copper-zinc binary phase diagram showing the chemistry range of five different most-common wrought brasses. The α-copper phase can dissolve up to 38.95% Zn at 454 °C (849 °F). The β phase is body-centered cubic (bcc); the β′ phase is an ordered bcc structure (see text). More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 13 Copper-rich side of the copper-silicon binary phase diagram indicating that all compounds within this system form in the region between copper and Cu-14wt%Si (26.9 at.% Si). The solution-annealing temperature, e.g., in alloy C64700 (Cu-1.6 to 2.2 wt% Ni-0.40 to 0.80 wt% Si), should More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 9 Partial binary phase diagram depicting quenched martensite start (M s ) and deformation-induced martensite (M d ). More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Iron-carbon binary phase diagram with superimposed temperature ranges for full annealing, process annealing, spheroidizing, normalizing, and austenitizing for hardening More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 3 Titanium-nitrogen binary phase diagram including recent experimental work by H. Okamoto. Source: Ref 53 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 21 Model binary phase diagram showing the composition and sintering temperature associated with liquid phase sintering in the L + S 2 phase field. The favorable characteristics for liquid phase sintering include a suppression of the melting temperature, high solid solubility More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 37 Idealized binary phase diagram for solid-state activated sintering. The mixture has a composition in a two-phase region at the sintering temperature. The activator A is nearly insoluble in the base B, but B is highly soluble in A. The phase diagram is rather similar More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2 Iron-carbon binary phase diagram with superimposed full annealing, process annealing, and spheroidizing treatments. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7 Iron-carbon binary phase diagram showing the temperature region for process annealing More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2 Iron-chromium pseudo-binary phase diagram for a carbon content of 0.10 wt%. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 Iron-carbon binary phase diagram, where solid lines indicate the metastable Fe-Fe 3 C diagram and dashed lines are from the iron-graphite equilibrium diagram. Reprinted from Ref 1 , adapted from Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 Niobium-tin binary phase diagram. (a) Elevated temperatures. (b) Subzero temperatures. M f , temperature at which martensite formation finishes during cooling; M s , temperature at which martensite starts to form on cooling. Sources: Ref 11 , 12 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Binary phase diagram for the system ZnCl 2 /NH 4 CL More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 Portion of aluminum-copper binary phase diagram. Temperature ranges for annealing, precipitation heat treating, and solution heat treating are indicated. More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Quasi-binary phase diagram for the WC-Co system More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Iron-chromium-carbon pseudo-binary phase diagram for 12 wt% Cr steel. Circled numbers represent the four HAZ regions shown in Fig. 3 and 6 . Source: Adapted from Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 19 Flowchart showing effect of α′ and β stabilizers on a binary phase diagram. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 11 Schematic binary phase diagram illustrating the effect of cooling rate on an alloy lying outside the equilibrium eutectic transformation line. Rapid solidification from S x to a metastable position (S*) can result in some eutectic structure being formed, because the last liquid More