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austenitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steel

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... steels, whereas the higher-carbon martensitic stainless steels are among the most difficult metals to machine. Austenitic and precipitation-hardening stainless steels vary more widely in machining characteristics within each class than do the ferritic and martensitic grades. Most easily machined...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005961
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...-7 PH, Alloy PH 15-7 Mo, AM-350, Pyromet 350, AM-355, and Pyromet 355; austenitic PH stainless steel, A-286; cast PH stainless steels; and iron-nickel PH superalloys. annealing austenitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steel heat treatment iron-base superalloys martensitic precipitation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002403
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
...Abstract Abstract This article summarizes the key mechanical characteristics of various types of stainless steel, including ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, precipitation hardening, and duplex steels. Particular emphasis is on fracture properties and corrosion fatigue. The article tabulates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... microscopic examination microstructures stainless steel metallography stainless steel microstructures STAINLESS STEELS are complex alloys containing a minimum of 11% Cr plus other elements to produce ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, duplex, or precipitation-hardenable grades. Procedures used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005959
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
..., precipitation-hardenable (PH) stainless, and martensitic stainless ( Ref 16 , 23 , 31 , 32 , 33 , 34 ). Commercially, the Kolsterizing process was the dominant process on the market throughout these years, and treatment of steel qualities other than austenitic stainless was not recommended for low...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... of the stainless grades. The high alloying causes the thermal decomposition of austenite (into pearlite) to be so sluggish that austenite undergoes athermal decomposition (into martensite). This being the case, the hardenability of martensitic stainless steel is very high. Maximum hardness is produced by air...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001476
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... ranging from 650 to 675 °C (1200 to 1250 °F) is commonly used to restore properties and reduce internal welding stresses. Austenitic electrodes are used for minor repairs or when properties are not the prime consideration (see Table 3 ). Precipitation-Hardening Stainless Steels Precipitation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001048
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
.... It gives some typical compositions of wrought heat-resistant stainless steels, which are grouped into ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, and precipitation-hardening (PH) grades. Quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steels are essentially martensitic and harden when air cooled from the austenitizing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001412
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... stainless steels. heat treatment martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels material selection microstructure semi-austenitic precipitation-hardening steels solidification PRECIPITATION-HARDENING (PH) STAINLESS STEELS are iron-chromium-nickel alloys with corrosion resistance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
..., and fasteners. Precipitation-Hardening Stainless Steels Precipitation-hardening stainless steels are chromium-nickel alloys containing precipitation-hardening elements such as copper, aluminum, or titanium. Precipitation-hardening stainless steels may be either austenitic or martensitic in the annealed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005884
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... primary types of stainless steels: austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation-hardening stainless steels. This classification refers to the base type of microstructure that the stainless steel possesses. The 200- and 300-series alloys comprise the austenitic grades, which have a microstructure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001046
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses the composition, characteristics, and properties of the five groups of wrought stainless steels: martensitic stainless steels, ferritic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels, duplex stainless steels, and precipitation-hardening stainless steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005939
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
.... At the cooling rates typical of industrial processes, however, the path will cross the carbide “nose” and precipitation will occur (path B ). Similar problems are encountered in nitridation of these steels. Carburization at low temperatures proved capable of hardening the surface of austenitic stainless steel...
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 1 General comparison of the hot-strength characteristics of austenitic, martensitic, and ferritic stainless steels with those of low-carbon unalloyed steel and semiaustenitic precipitation and transformation-hardening steels. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 18 General comparison of the hot-strength characteristics of austenitic, martensitic, and ferritic stainless steels with those of low-carbon unalloyed steel and semiaustenitic precipitation and transformation-hardening steels More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
...Abstract Abstract Stainless steels are primarily alloys of iron and chromium. They are grouped into five families, primarily based on their microstructure: ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening. Three out of the five families of stainless steels, namely...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... on annealing of different types of stainless steels such as austenitic, ferritic, duplex, martensitic, and precipitation-hardening, and on the heat treatment of superalloys and refractory metals. It discusses the recommended procedures for solution annealing, austenite conditioning, transformation cooling...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and mechanical properties of five major stainless steel families, of which four are based on the crystallographic structure of the alloys, including martensitic, ferritic, austenitic, or duplex. The fifth is precipitation-hardenable alloys, based on the type of heat treatment used. The article further discusses...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002180
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... in this article. Classification of Stainless Steels Stainless steels can be divided into five families. Four are based on the characteristic microstructure of the alloys in the family: ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, or duplex (austenitic plus ferritic). The fifth family, the precipitation-hardenable...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003180
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...-carbon steels. In general, stainless steels have the following characteristics, as compared with carbon steels: (a) greater strength; (b) greater susceptibility to work hardening (austenitic grades); (c) more abrasiveness; (d) higher probability of welding and galling; and (e) lower heat conductivity...