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austenitic manganese steels

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel exhibits high toughness and ductility with high work-hardening capacity and, usually, good wear resistance. Beginning with an overview of the as-cast properties and composition of these class of steels, this article discusses the heat treatment...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003162
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... hardfacing alloys can be divided into pearlitic steels, austenitic (manganese) steels, martensitic steels, high-alloy irons, and austenitic stainless steel. The types of nonferrous hardfacing alloys include cobalt-base/carbide-type alloys, laves phase alloys, nickel-base/boride-type alloys, and bronze type...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... market. A number of highly serviceable enameling iron replacement products are now available for porcelain enameling. These aluminum killed steels have low carbon (0.02 to 0.04 wt%) and low manganese (0.15 to 0.30 wt%), along with 0.015 wt% P max, 0.015 wt% S max, 0.015 wt% Si max, and 0.03 to 0.07 wt...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... steels and cast irons, the microstructural constituents have the names ferrite, pearlite, bainite, martensite, cementite, and austenite. The article presents four examples that have very different microstructures: the structural steel has a ferrite plus pearlite microstructure; the rail steel has a fully...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... cooled rapidly, it will change to martensite. In addition to iron and carbon, steels contain many other elements that shift the boundaries of the iron-carbon phase diagram. Elements such as manganese and nickel are austenite stabilizers, which lower critical temperatures. Elements such as silicon...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003812
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... steels, as defined by the crystallographic structure. These include ferritic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels, martensitic stainless steels, and precipitation-hardening stainless steels. The mechanism of corrosion protection for stainless steels is reviewed. The article examines the effects...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... table that lists the effect of iron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and density on the corrosion resistance of the sintered austenitic stainless steels. chemical composition corrosion resistance high-density powder metallurgy isostatic pressing mechanical properties medium-density powder...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... properties of five major stainless steel families, of which four are based on the crystallographic structure of the alloys, including martensitic, ferritic, austenitic, or duplex. The fifth is precipitation-hardenable alloys, based on the type of heat treatment used. The article further discusses the factors...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003992
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... excessively oxidizing atmosphere can impair corrosion resistance, either by harmful carbon pickup or by chromium depletion. In types 309 and 310, chromium depletion can be especially severe. Nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels are iron-base alloys containing chromium and manganese. Varying...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
.... The method chosen for forming stainless steel should be based on the characteristics of the type to be used and the thickness of the part to be formed. As indicated previously, power requirements are higher for forming stainless steels than for forming carbon steels—particularly austenitic types...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
..., strength, or other property can be achieved. Varying the temperature, time at temperature, and cooling rate of the heat treatment also controls the desired results. It is useful to think of the compositions of high-alloy steels in terms of the balance between austenite promoters and ferrite promoters...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... powder metallurgy or mechanical alloying techniques Alloy carbides bonded by steel matrices Other ferrous materials, such as high-manganese austenitic steels and various classes of cast irons, are also widely used for wear-resistance applications (see the article “Wear-Resistant Austenitic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005936
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... shows approximately 40 vol.% retained austenite. In low-alloy steels, alloying elements differently influence the amount of retained austenite. Molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and manganese, for example, enlarge the amount of retained austenite to an increasing amount in the given sequence. Hence, 18CrNi8...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... steels are in competition to promote austenite or ferrite phases in the alloy microstructure. Chromium, silicon, molybdenum, and niobium promote the presence of ferrite in the alloy microstructure; nickel, carbon, nitrogen, and manganese promote the presence of austenite. By balancing the contents of...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... martensite content on hardness are shown in Fig. 1 . Fig. 1 Effect of carbon on hardness of martensite structures The hardenability of steel is governed almost entirely by the chemical composition (carbon and alloy content) at the austenitizing temperature and the austenite grain size at the...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., create the properties of stainless steel. The film is first observed at approximately 10.5% Cr, but it is rather weak at this composition and affords only mild atmospheric protection. Increasing the chromium content to 17 to 20%, as typical of the austenitic stainless steels, or to 26 to 29%, as possible...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005414
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... grain growth. Numerous studies have been published on the subject of recrystallization and grain growth in carbon-manganese and high-strength low-alloy HSLA steels. Most of the early studies did not attempt to model postrolling austenite decomposition, primarily due to the complexities involved in...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... thickness ranges. Maximum limits of chemical composition are generally published because the carbon and alloy contents are varied as necessary to maintain mechanical properties in products of various thicknesses. High-strength structural carbon steels are basically carbon-manganese or carbon...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... elements. Manganese is normally present in all commercial steels. It is important in the manufacture of steel because it deoxidizes the melt and facilitates hot working of the steel by reducing the susceptibility to hot shortness. Manganese also combines with sulfur to form manganese sulfide stringers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000605
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... confirmed by x-ray fluorescent analysis to have been, at the moment of fracture, liquid droplets of manganese oxysulfide on the dendrite surfaces. These patterns were the only evidence of segregation that was discovered within the fracture. Fig. 152 Fracture surface of a carbon steel drive shaft of a...