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atomic force microscopy

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006658
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... information on the factors applicable to the accuracy and precision of AFM measurements. It ends by discussing the applications for AFMs in the fields of science, technology, and engineering. precision atomic force microscopy Overview Introduction There are three general types of microscopes...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 12 Atomic force microscopy probe showing closeup of tip More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 13 Schematic showing the principle of atomic force microscopy More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 10 Schematic showing the mechanism for atomic force microscopy imaging More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 11 Atomic force microscopy images of the fine surface texture of corrosion products on (a) 316L stainless steel, (b) cast Co-Cr-Mo (ASTM F75), (c) commercially pure titanium (ASTM F67), (d) Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM F136), and (e) Nitinol (ASTM F2063) surfaces. All images show a domelike oxide film More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 12 Atomic force microscopy three-dimensional image of the surface texture of a titanium-nitride-coated electrode More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 12 Typical atomic force microscopy images of (a) freshly cleaved, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and (b) mica surfaces taken using a square pyramidal Si 3 N 4 tip More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 16 (a) Vibrating-mode atomic force microscopy image of a reference sample. (b) Line profile showing dimensions of the features. (c) The pitch is 10 μm, and the height of the features is 100 nm. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 18 Vibrating-mode atomic force microscopy image of DNA deposited on mica More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 20 A 2 × 2 μm atomic force microscopy image of an indium/tin oxide thin film deposited on a glass substrate. Nanometer-sized features are directly observed in this image. It should be noted that this material in optically transparent. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 22 Atomic force microscopy images of commercially available aluminum foil. (a) Shiny side of foil. (b) Dull side of foil. Each image is 50 × 50 μm and was measured in nonvibrating mode. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 23 (a) 40 × 40 μm atomic force microscopy image of a processed silicon sample coated with silicon oxide. (b) Surface roughness parameters for the processed silicon image. (c) Line profile of silicon image, designated by red line More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 24 Atomic force microscopy image of a gear fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technology. The image is 50 × 50 μm and was measured in vibrating mode. More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 9 Atomic force microscopy image of a type III anodic oxide structure on a high-purity aluminum substrate shows that the finish piles up at the substrate grain boundaries, even on a most ideal substrate. More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 8 Schematic of the principle operation of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 10 (Top images) Atomic force microscopy images and (bottom images) cross-section profiles of nanowear scars formed on (a) Si(100) substrate and (b) diamondlike carbon (DLC) coated silicon surface More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Three-dimensional atomic force microscopy images of the microstructures of (a) 316L stainless steel, (b) cast Co-Cr-Mo (ASTM F75), (c) CP-Ti (ASTM F67), (d) Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM F136), and (e) NiTi (ASTM F2063). All images show domelike oxide film structure. Scan size, 5 μm×5 μm; pitch angle More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Sequential atomic force microscopy images (contact mode, deflection image) of CP-Ti surface (etched sample, same spot). Scanning size, 5 μm; height scale, 20 nm. (a) In air. (b) Immersion in phosphate-buffered saline, 1day. (c) Two week immersion. (d) Four week immersion and after step More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 45 Working principle of an atomic force microscopy instrument More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006387
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... measurement at the nanoscale, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement and scanning electron microscopy measurement. It reviews the techniques of wear measurement at the atomic level, namely, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement and AFM combined with TEM measurement. atomic force...