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anisotropic grain

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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 16 Potts model simulation of anisotropic grain growth. (a) Relationship between misorientation distribution function (MDF) of the evolved system and the energy function. (b) Two-dimensional microstructure growth showing the multijunctions that form with highly anisotropic energy functions More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 7 Effect of anisotropic boundary energy on microstructure during grain growth of a two-component system in which the initial distribution of the A and B components was equal. (a) R A = R B = 1, kT s = 0.75; the isotropic case. (b) R A = R B = 1.5, kT s = 0.75. (c) R More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 38 Anisotropic growth of a grain in rolled aluminum. Prior to annealing, the grain boundary was located at the top of the handle. The micrograph shows the front and back faces of the specimen. The long, straight grain boundaries are approximately perpendicular to the <111> rotation More
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Published: 01 January 2005
(normal grain-growth case); (b) Case B, initial, single component texture, weakly anisotropic grain-boundary properties; and (c) Case C, initial, single-component texture, strongly anisotropic grain-boundary properties. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
texture and isotropic boundary properties (normal grain-growth case). (b) Case B, initial, single component texture, weakly anisotropic grain-boundary properties. (c) Case C, initial, single component texture, strongly anisotropic grain-boundary properties. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 17 Evolution of microstructure during a Potts model simulation of anisotropic grain growth of a single-texture component, using Read-Shockley energies and anisotropic mobilities to show the emergence of an abnormal grain More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 19 Evolution of microstructure during a Potts model simulation of anisotropic grain growth in a texture gradient, using Read-Shockley energies and anisotropic mobilities. The simulation was performed using a square (1,2) lattice, Glauber dynamics, metropolis transition probability More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 13 Spark plug alumina insulator. The light micrograph shows the microstructure with anisotropic grains, a glassy grain-boundary phase, and large pores. Etch polished with alumina and Murakami's solution More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 13 Boundary geometry used to validate the Q -state Potts model for anisotropic grain growth. Boundary conditions are continuous in the x -direction and fixed in the y -direction. The boundary between grain A and grains B and C is the only boundary that moves. θ 1 is the misorientation More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 15 Evolution of microstructure during a Potts model simulation of anisotropic grain growth of a single-texture component, using Read-Shockley energies and uniform mobilities. The simulation was performed using a square (1,2) lattice, Glauber dynamics, metropolis transition probability More
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Published: 01 December 2009
. (b) A condition involving recovery, heterogeneous nucleation at sites of high stored energy, and anisotropic grain-boundary (GB) properties. MCS, Monte Carlo steps. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
plate. The number of intersections between these nine test lines and the anisotropic grain boundaries is equal to 36. The effective length of cycloid minor axis was 138 μm. The length of a cycloid arc is two times the length of its minor axis. Therefore, the number of intersections per unit test line More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Carlo systems cannot be emphasized enough. A section then deals with how to ate experimental parameters and how to validate the model by comparing the observed behavior quantitatively with theory. Industrial applications of the model are dealt with next, covering anisotropic grain growth, abnormal grain...
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 2 Microstructure that is not suitable for areal analysis techniques. (a) Microstructure of a hot-rolled partially recrystallized 7050 aluminum alloy containing large anisotropic recrystallized grains and unrecrystallized regions containing subgrains. In such microstructures digital image More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 7 Anisotropic microstructure of a specimen of cold rolled extra-low-carbon steel, where the number of intersections between a test line and grain boundaries strongly depends on the angular orientation of the test line. For example, in this microstructure, a vertical test line is expected More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 11 Light micrograph of a dental prosthesis. Textured alumina with anisotropically grown grains, with an average size of 2–4 μm and a porosity of <0.5%. Thermally etched at 1500 °C (2730 °F) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004028
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
..., it explains the simpler polycrystal models in terms of the relative strength of the HEM and the inclusion. Furthermore, in the case of highly anisotropic crystals, such conclusion also applies to the relative directional stiffness between the medium and the grain. For example, in the case of hcp crystals...
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Published: 01 December 2004
and shows some grain orientation. The steel is yellow-green. 15×. (b) Note the difference between the anisotropic zirconium (top) and the isotropic steel (bottom) under polarized light illumination. 85×. (P.E. Danielson) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003795
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... grain size and a porosity of less than 0.5%. Figure 11 illustrates a microstructure characterized by anisotropically grown grains with an average size of 2 to 4 μm. The resulting texture is caused by a preferred orientation of alumina seed crystals during injection molding. The microstructure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009002
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
...) grain-growth behavior for materials with various starting textures and assumed grain-boundary properties. (a) Case A, isotropic starting texture and isotropic boundary properties (normal grain-growth case); (b) Case B, initial, single component texture, weakly anisotropic grain-boundary properties...