1-20 of 103 Search Results for

abrasion artifacts

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003747
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... describes the abrasion artifacts in austenitic steels, zinc, ferritic steels, and pearlitic steels, and other effects of abrasion damages, including flatness of abraded surfaces and embedding of abrasive. Different polishing damages, such as degradation of etching contrast and scratch traces, are reviewed...
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
features are abrasion artifacts. (b) Same area as in (a), but then polished on a woven silk cloth charged with a 6 μm grade diamond abrasive for 3 min. Some of the abrasion artifacts remain. (c) Same area as for (b) but further polished on a napped cloth charged with a 1 μm grade diamond abrasive More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 26 Sintered WC-15Ti. (a) Dark, angular areas are artifacts due to chipping during abrasion of 6 μm diamond-plastic lap. (b) Result of polishing the abraded surface for comparatively short period on a cotton drill cloth charged with 6 μm diamond abrasive. Many of the deeper pits produced More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... of samples prone to abrasion damage and artifacts for quantitative image analysis. abrasion artifacts abrasion damage computer technology microhardness analysis microstructural analysis optical microscopy quantitative image analysis sample preparation surface analysis surface finishing...
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
about 5 μm of metal was removed. The banded markings are abrasion artifacts (false structures). (c) Micrograph showing the true microstructure taken after abrasion on 220-grit silicon carbide paper and then polished until about 15 μm of metal was removed. All three specimens were etched in an aqueous More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
1 μm (b) and 3 μm (c) of metal are removed. Abrasion artifacts are shown in (b). The true structure is shown in (c). Electrolytic: oxalic acid. 500× More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
μm (c) of metal are removed. The banded markings in (b) are false structures (abrasion artifacts). The true structure is shown in (c). Aqueous ferric chloride. 250× More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 6 Pearlitic steel. (a) Results of abrading on an abrasive belt and then polishing for only long enough to remove abrasion scratches; structure contains abrasion-deformation artifacts. (b) Results of abrading on 600-grit silicon carbide paper and then polishing only long enough to remove More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 27 Effect of different abrading and polishing techniques on the appearance of oxide scale on high-purity iron. (a) Specimen abraded on 400-grit silicon carbide paper; numerous chipping artifacts are present in the oxide. (b) Specimen abraded on a fine fixed-abrasive lap; minor chipping More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 55 Examples of artifact-free or nearly artifact-free surfaces produced by different manual final polishing methods on 30% Zn annealed brass (similar to C26000). (a) Polished manually using 0.1 μm grade polycrystalline diamond abrasive. Etched in a ferric chloride reagent. (b) Polished More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
by an electromechanical technique using Al 2 O 3 abrasive suspended in a saturated aqueous solution of NaOH. The etch-attack technique produced some grain relief and many wiping marks. The electromechanical technique produced a surface in which no structure could be seen before etching. A satisfactory artifact-free More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
to remove abrasion scratches. (c) Results of abrading on 600-grit silicon carbide paper and polishing only long enough to remove abrasion scratches. (b) and (c) Banded markings and generally artifact-dominated structure. (d) Results of abrading on 600-grit silicon carbide paper and polishing for a longer More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009073
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... step, the surface should be nearly free of artifacts that can be seen at 100× magnification. As with all steps, it is necessary to thoroughly clean the samples between each polishing step so that there are no residual abrasive particles that can be transferred to the next step. If this occurs...
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 18 Artifact microstructures in (a), (b), and (c) that developed by heating the specimen during sectioning on an abrasive cutoff wheel. (a) Tempered martensite (gray) in a ferrite matrix (white). (b) Tempered martensite (gray) and pearlite (dark) in a ferrite matrix (white). (c) Pearlite More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003244
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... be removed if the true structure is to be examined. However, because abrasive grinding and polishing steps also produce damage, where the depth of damage decreases with decreasing abrasive size, the preparation sequence must be carefully planned and performed. Otherwise, preparation-induced artifacts...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002156
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract Abrasive jet machining (AJM) is a process that removes material from a workpiece through the use of abrasive particles entrained in a high-velocity gas stream. This article discusses the operation of principal components, advantages, and disadvantages of the AJM system. It describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003761
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
.... If the specimen is not properly secured with a clamp, the wheel is likely to break. A steady, firm pressure must be maintained against the specimen. Careless use of an abrasive cutoff machine, even with coolant capability, can result in artifacts, as depicted in Fig. 18 . In this example, too much force...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article describes the various environmental factors that cause corrosion on metal artifacts, which include water, temperature fluctuations, pollutants, local conditions of acidity or alkalinity, vegetation, and animals. The corrosion processes experienced by five common metals...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004142
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... the artifact from physical damage (mechanical abrasion, wave action) ( Ref 14 , 26 , 27 ). The concretion is usually the result of encapsulation by marine organisms, mainly those such as corals, coralline algae, tubeworms, and shellfish that leave behind a calcium carbonate skeleton after they die ( Ref 11...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003464
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... so that artifacts are not introduced. Therefore, when sectioning the part, never use a band saw with a tooth blade, because it may damage the specimen. Instead, use an abrasive band saw to cut large parts down to a manageable size. Rough cutting may be performed without lubrication or cutting fluids...