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Wire rope

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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 19 Fretting fatigue failure of steel wire rope after seawater service. Wire diameter was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.). See also Fig. 20 . Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 1 End of a steel wire-rope wire that failed in tension because of overloading. Necking at the end of the wire indicates ductile fracture. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 20 Optical images of typical wire-rope surface. Several external wire breaks (arrows) were observed. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Carbon steel wire rope. (a) Carbon steel highline being used to transfer equipment between ships at sea. (b) Seven-strand carbon steel wire rope with maintenance grease. ( Ref 3 ) Typical wooden spool used to store wire rope More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Terminals for wire rope rigging. (a) Swage terminal fitting. (b) Norseman and Sta-Lok terminal fitting More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 9 Examples of fretting on inner strands of drag line wire rope More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 9 Examples of fretting on inner strands of drag-line wire rope More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Cross sections of typical locked-coil track strand wire rope construction. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 End of a steel wire rope that failed in tension because of overloading. Necking at the ends of the wires indicates ductile fracture; no worn or abraded areas were found at the break. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Components of a steel wire rope. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Steel wire rope with heavy corrosion and broken individual wires resulting from intermittent underwater service. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Steel wire rope, used on a cleaning-line crane, that failed from fatigue resulting from vibration caused by shock loading. (a) Section of the wire rope adjacent to the fracture. Approximately 1 1 2 ×. (b) Unetched longitudinal section of a wire from the rope showing fatigue More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Wire rope, made of improved plow steel with a fiber core, that failed because of heavy abrasion and crushing under normal loading. (a) Crushed rope showing abraded wires and crown wear. 1.8×. (b) Nital-etched specimen showing martensite layer (top) and uniform, heavily drawn More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Cross sections of typical locked-coil track strand wire rope construction More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 2 Components of a steel wire rope. Source: Ref 1 . Created by P. Toone. Courtesy of OSHA DTSEM/SLTC More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Optical images of typical outer wire-rope surface (a) remote from and (b) near to the fracture surface. Some abrasion (arrows in a) was observed along the crowns of the wires. Internal wire breaks (shown in b) were observed frequently near the fracture. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 5 Optical images of typical outer strands of core wire rope near the fracture surface. The observed interstrand nicking (white arrows) and fractures (red arrows) are shown in (b). More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 8 Steel wire rope with heavy corrosion and broken individual wires resulting from intermittent underwater service More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 10 Optical images of typical outer strands of the wire rope. Interstrand nicking (arrows in a) as well as wire breaks through the nicking damage (arrows in b) were observed. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 14 Photographs of typical sections of wire rope. The polymer sleeve was removed due to abrasion and wear, exposing the crown of the wires; plastic damage was observed along the crowns of the wires. More