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Welded joints, corrosion

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 If a weld joint separates as a result of corrosion, it is difficult to repair to its original structural integrity. Courtesy of the NRPA NPSI More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract This article focuses on friction stir welding (FSW), where frictional heating and displacement of the plastic material occurs by a rapidly rotating tool traversing the weld joint. Much of the research activity early on pertained to issues related to understanding the process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... compatibility. Selection should be based on the strength required, service environment, or the cost of the welding product. Table 5 lists the recommended filler metals to use when welding numerous dissimilar metal combinations. Welding products for dissimilar-metal joints between nickel-base corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001414
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...-alloy steels. As a general rule, the weld metal should be at least equal in strength and corrosion properties to the poorest component in the joint. Additionally, there should be no intermetallic compounds or other phases to degrade the properties of the weld metal. Further, the microstructure must...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006808
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... not involve melting. As shown in Fig. 2 , there are many different processes available for welding metals ( Ref 3 ), and the selection depends on the type of material, geometry, application, cost, and properties targeted at the joint, among others. When metals are welded together, acceptance criteria...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006828
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... clearance, joining position Each of these topics influences wetting and spreading behavior, joint mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and residual-stress levels. For example, the properties of brazed joints in copper alloys can be degraded if low-melting elements, such as lead, tellurium...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006822
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... to the upstream and downstream girth welds, and position and orientation relative to the long-seam weld Dimensional analysis to confirm and document pipe diameter, wall thickness and roundness, and measurement of the extent of corrosion or mechanical damage (if present). Dimensional analyses may include...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
...), precautions must be taken to avoid several other types of corrosion that may result from the welding process. Weld joints should be designed to avoid potential sites for crevice corrosion. Materials susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (austenitic stainless steels in particular) should be given a stress...
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Corrosion pillowing on aircraft skin at joint. Aluminum alloy 2024-T4 skin is joined to doubler by spot welding and with fasteners (2017-T3). Rivet holes for the lap joint are seen in the lower (inside) portion of the joint. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001418
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... a positive attribute when considering weldability, because many of the alloy additions needed for precipitation hardening (for example, copper plus magnesium, or magnesium plus silicon) can lead to liquation or hot cracking during welding. In addition, joint efficiencies are higher in non-heat-treatable...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005567
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... a weld by heating two or more workpieces to the welding temperature and forcing them through an extrusion die. This article illustrates typical joint configurations used for manual and automatic forge welding applications. It provides information on the common metals welded by coextrusion welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005622
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... such as sulfur in the base material, especially in austenitic stainless steels (lower part of Fig. 1 ). To overcome these problems and reduce the cost of fabrication and construction of a variety of products, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) and the National Joint Council ( Ref 1 , Ref 2 , 3 ) developed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001441
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... welding (LBW) Friction welding (FRW) Resistance welding (RW) Resistance spot welding (RSW) Resistance seam welding (RSEW) The selection of a welding process depends on several factors: weld joint, tensile and corrosion-resistant property requirements, cost, and design configuration...