1-20 of 273 Search Results for

Valve springs

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Valve springs made from patented and drawn high-carbon steel wire. Distorted outer spring (left) exhibited about 25% set because of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure and high operating temperature. Outer spring (right) is satisfactory. More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 6 Valve springs made from patented and drawn high-carbon steel wire. Distorted outer spring (a) exhibited approximately 25% set because of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure and high operating temperature. Outer spring (b) is satisfactory More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Valve spring that failed due to fatigue. Fractographs of similar valve springs are shown in Fig. 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , and 11 . 0.8× More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 1 Minimum tensile strength of steel spring wire. VSQ, valve-spring quality More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 37 Fracture surface of a hardened steel valve spring that failed in torsional fatigue. Arrow indicates fracture origin at a subsurface nonmetallic inclusion. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Valve-spring failure due to residual shrinkage pipe. (a) Macrograph showing fracture as indicated by arrow. (b) Fracture surface; pipe is indicated by arrow. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Transverse failure origin in a valve spring made from ground rod. The transverse marks (arrow) are remnants of the grinding operation. 8× More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Support fingers to transfer very short parts (e.g., valve-spring retainers) or stepped parts at high production speeds. Parts are supported between the support fingers and the kickout pins during kickout. Courtesy of M. van Thiel, Nedschroef Herentals N.V. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 26 Variations in dimensions of 1010 steel valve-spring retainers randomly selected from three lots. Parts were produced in a five-station nut former. Dimensions given in inches More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Valve-spring failure due to residual shrinkage pipe. (a) Macrograph showing fracture, as indicated by arrow. (b) Fracture surface; pipe is indicated by arrow. More
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 262 Fatigue-fractured valve spring of 4.8-mm ( 3 16 -in.) diam AISI 1060 steel wire. The wire appears to be free of surface defects, a conclusion that is supported by the evidence in Fig. 263 . 2× More
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 271 Surface of a complex fatigue fracture in a valve spring formed from AISI 1070 steel wire, showing two facets at right angles. 8× More
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 305 Fatigue failure of an automotive engine valve spring made of a steel similar to ASTM A230. The spring was shot peened; service stresses were very high. Cause of fracture was a seam 15 μm (0.5 mils) deep. The surface defect initiated a longitudinal shear crack that propagated More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 44 Fracture surface of a hardened - steel valve spring that failed in torsional fatigue. Arrow indicates fracture origin at a subsurface nonmetallic inclusion . More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 1 Valve-spring failure due to residual shrinkage during solidification. (a) Macrograph showing fracture, as indicated by arrow. (b) Fracture surface; pipe is indicated by arrow. Source: Ref 4 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000607
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
...-embrittlement fracture, fatigue crack propagation, and corrosion fatigue of components made from high-carbon steels. The high-carbon steel components include bull gear, drive shaft, power boiler stoker grate, steel wheel, spring wire, suspension spring, automotive engine valve spring, power spring, cantilever...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... most spring applications involve operating temperatures that are not far above or below room temperature, many applications require springs to operate over an appreciable temperature range. For instance, valve springs in internal-combustion engines must operate in frigid weather for start-up...
Book Chapter

By Loren Godfrey
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001019
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... 0.80–1.10, V 0.15 min 1310–2070 (190–300) 210 (30) 45 80 (11.5) 41–55 220 (425) Heat treated before fabrication; for shock loads and moderately elevated temperature; ASTM A 232 for valve springs Modified chromium vanadium VSQ (d) , ASTM A 878 C 0.60–0.75, Cr 0.35–0.60, V 0.10–0.25 1410–2000...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005138
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... of pitch to spring diameter. By increasing the limits slightly, coiling speed and production rate may be increased. Many springs are acceptable with inaccuracies or with a wide tolerance in dimensions and performance, but some springs (valve springs, for instance) must be more accurate. Variations...
Book Chapter

By Mark Hayes
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
...-alloy steels such as AISI 4160, 6150H, and 8660H for hot-wound forms. For small springs, music wire (ASTM A 228) is the highest-quality carbon steel (with a surface quality almost comparable to that of valve spring wire). Hard-drawn wire (ASTM 227) is the least expensive and has the lowest surface...