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Transition joints

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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 16 Transition joints for joining dissimilar metals. (a) Tubular transition joints for welding dissimilar-metal pipes and tubes. (b) Transition joint blocks for dissimilar-metal electrical connections More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 20 (a) Forward tube extrusion of transition joints. (b) Encapsulation by ironing. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Tubular welding transition joints for hermetic welds between titanium, aluminum, and zirconium and stainless steel More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 4 Transition joint materials for joining dissimilar metals in shipboard and marine equipment construction More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Aluminum-to-stainless weld accomplished with an explosion-bonded tubular transition joint. Aluminum and stainless steel are welded to the respective ends using conventional fusion-welding processes. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001376
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of EXW are made available to a broader industrial base through the concept of welding transition joints ( Fig. 3 ). Fig. 2 Titanium/steel explosion-bonded clad plate Fig. 3 Aluminum-to-stainless weld accomplished with an explosion-bonded tubular transition joint. Aluminum and stainless...
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 15 Schematic showing transition in mechanism of joint formation More
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Published: 01 January 2002
base metals. Transition joints can be used when a galvanic couple is anticipated at the design stage, and weld beads should be properly oriented to minimize galvanic effects. (c) Local damage can result from cuts across heavily worked areas. End grains should not be left exposed. (d) Galvanic corrosion More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 31 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 7 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when More
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Published: 15 January 2021
base metals. Transition joints can be used when a galvanic couple is anticipated at the design stage, and weld beads should be properly oriented to minimize galvanic effects. (c) Local damage can result from cuts across heavily worked areas. End grains should not be left exposed. RD, rolling direction More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005602
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... clad plates of almost any metal combination can be manufactured economically. Applications of EXW are diverse and include the production of sandwiched metal for coinage ( Ref 4 ), the production of titanium-to-stainless steel transition joints in the Apollo spacecraft ( Ref 5 ), and production...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... ) are examples of transition joints that are made by FRW. Titanium can be welded to stainless steel with extreme care ( Ref 18 ), and other incompatible dissimilar combinations may be successfully welded using interlayer techniques ( Ref 19 ). Figure 5 shows a micrograph of the interfacial region...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005575
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... are comparatively easy to friction weld to other metals. For example, austenitic stainless steel to low-alloy steel ( Ref 20 ), titanium and copper to stainless steel ( Ref 21 ), and 1100 aluminum to stainless steel ( Ref 22 ) are examples of transition joints that are made by FRW. Titanium can be welded...
Book Chapter

By Niels Bay
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005581
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... × 0.60 in.) and 10 × 100 mm (0.40 × 4.0 in.), respectively. Aluminum-aluminum sheet that is 0.3 × 35 mm (0.01 × 1.4 in.) Extrusion Tube transition joints of aluminum-stainless steel, aluminum-titanium, and zirconium-mild steel are manufactured for nuclear power and space technology by forward...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... transition joints in the Apollo spacecraft ( Ref 4 ), and the use of aluminum-to-steel transition joints in ships. The most common utilization of explosive bonding is the production of clad metals for the purpose of corrosion resistance and for transition joints that are used to aid dissimilar metal welding...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 43 Mean coefficients of thermal expansion as a function of temperature for transition butt-joint materials. Source: Ref 33 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002384
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... with the local region in the actual structure. Fig. 22 Effects of loading rate, thickness, specimen dimensions, and crack depth on the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior For welded joints, the challenge of generating toughness information is increased further by the nonhomogeneous nature...
Book Chapter

By K. Sampath
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002488
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... processes. The selection of the appropriate solid-state welding process would depend on joint (part) geometry. A transition joint between a plate and a pipe is best produced using a friction welding process, while a joint between two large plate surfaces is best produced using explosive bonding. Because...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001381