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Torsional fatigue

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 37 Fully reversed torsional fatigue results for the SAE 1050M shafts. Source: Ref 43 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 44 Fully reversed torsional fatigue data for SAE 1040 test shafts. Source: Ref 43 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 45 Fully reversed torsional fatigue data for SAE 1541 test shafts. Source: Ref 43 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 46 Torsional fatigue life versus tempering temperature for several different shafts. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 9 Torsional fatigue life versus total case depth (at ±407 MPa, or 59 ksi). Q&T, quenched and tempered More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 10 Torsional fatigue life versus effective case depth (at ±407 MPa, or 59 ksi). Q&T, quenched and tempered More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 11 Full-float torsional fatigue of 1038 steel with ultimate torsion strength of 1359 MPa (1214–1566) and torsional yield strength (by Johnson elastic limit method) of 710 MPa (676–800). Effective case depth was 14% (11–28), with total case depth of 25% (16–33) and core hardness of 9 HRC More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Full-float torsional fatigue of 1541 steel with ultimate torsion strength of 1497 MPa (1207–1862) and torsional yield strength (by Johnson elastic limit method) of 966 MPa (710–1269). Effective case depth was 22% (15–33), with total case depth of 33% (17–50) and core hardness of 19 HRC More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 9 A torsional-fatigue fracture in an induction-hardened 1037 steel shaft 25 mm (1 in.) in diameter that finally fractured in longitudinal shear. No clear point of origin is visible because the surfaces rubbed as the crack propagated. Light fractograph. ∼0.95× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Torsional fatigue failure of boron-containing alloy steel helical spring. Fatigue initiated at an abraded area marked by arrows. The material in compression coil springs is subjected to unidirectional torsion, so fatigue propagates on a single helical surface. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Surface of a torsional-fatigue fracture in an induction-hardened 1041 (1541) steel shaft. The shaft fractured after 450 hours of endurance testing. 1 1 4 × More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Schematic of the initiation of torsional-fatigue cracks in shaft subjected to longitudinal shear (a) or transverse shear (b). Dashed lines indicate other cracks that can appear when torsional stresses are reversed. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 31 Fracture surfaces of a torsional fatigue-test specimen. Courtesy of Greg Fett, Dana Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 32 4340 steel rotor shaft that failed by torsional fatigue. (a) Shear groove designed to protect gear mechanism from sudden overload. Dimensions are in inches. (b) Star-shaped pattern on a fracture surface of the shaft. (c) Longitudinal and transverse shear cracks on the surface More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 4340 steel rotor shaft that failed by torsional fatigue. (a) Shear groove designed to protect gear mechanism from sudden overload. Dimensions are in inches. (b) Star-shaped pattern on a fracture surface of the shaft. (c) Longitudinal and transverse shear cracks on the surface More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Stress fields and corresponding torsional-fatigue cracks. (a) and (b) Shaft with keyway. (c) Shaft with splines More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 165 Torsional fatigue fracture in an 86-mm (3 3 8 -in.) diam keyed tapered shaft of 1030 steel, commonly termed a “peeling” type of fracture. A loose nut had reduced the frictional force on the tapered portion of the shaft, transferring the torsional load to the key. The fatigue More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 196 Surface of a bending-plus-torsional-fatigue fracture in an experimental 89-mm (3 1 2 -in.) diam tractor axle of AISI 1041 steel that had been induction hardened. Fracture occurred after 1212 h on an endurance-test track. Note beach marks fanning out from the fatigue-crack More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 197 Surface of a torsional-fatigue fracture in an induction-hardened AISI 1041 steel experimental tractor axle same as in Fig. 196 . Hardness in the hardened zone was 50 HRC at 11 to 12 mm ( 7 16 to 15 32 in.) beneath the axle surface at the crack origin. This axle More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 216 Surface of a torsional-fatigue fracture in an AISI 1045 steel crankshaft induction hardened to 55 HRC. The crack originated at the edge of an oil hole. Although it is not clearly evident in this view, the crack grew at a 45° angle to the axis of the crankshaft because of tensile More