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Tearing

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Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005238
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article summarizes some issues and approaches in performing computational analyses of mechanical behavior, distortion, and hot tearing during solidification. It presents the governing equations and describes the methods used to solve them. The article reviews the finite element...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005223
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... designed for measuring the hot tearing tendency in alloys are discussed. The article also discusses the temperature dependence, criteria, and modeling of hot tearing. castability fluidity hot tearing modeling CASTABILITY of alloys is a measure of their ability to be cast to a given shape...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005420
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the concepts involved in heat-transfer modeling, thermomechanical modeling, and microsegregation modeling of hot tearing. It discusses the modeling of solidification defects, namely, inclusion entrapment, segregation, shrinkage cavities, gas porosity, mold-wall...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Ductile tearing on a plane of maximum normal stress at the tip of a compact tension specimen. Material is O1 tool steel. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Schematic of (a) ductile tearing along plane normal to normal stress and (b) zig-zag path of void sheet fracture along shear planes More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 68 An example of crack-tip blunting and ductile tearing on plane of maximum normal stress in a quenched and tempered O1 tool steel. Source: Ref 75 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Influence of alloy composition on hot tearing susceptibility in aluminum-copper alloys. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 16 Comparison of critical casting speeds, based on hot-tearing criterion ( Ref 46 ), and typical plant practice ( Ref 87 ) More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 45 Weld metal pulling and tearing the partially melted zone (PMZ). (a) Schematic showing the formation of liquation cracking in the PMZ of a partial-penetration gas metal arc weld of an aluminum alloy. The welding direction is perpendicular to the rolling direction. The weld metal More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Methods used to reduce lamellar tearing. (a) Angling the weld fusion line to avoid shrinkage stresses in the through-thickness direction. (b) Use of smaller partial-penetration welds to reduce joint restraint. (c) Placement of welding beads on the thinner plate (when welding plates More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 50 Lamellar tearing in the HAZ of a carbon-manganese steel corner joint. Etched with 2% nital More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 6 Typical location for lamellar tearing in a T-joint. Stress across the plate thickness (the z- direction) occurs from strains that develop from weldmetal shrinkage in the joint. Lamellar separation is roughly parallel to the fusion line. Lamellar tearing can be prevented when More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Corner joint. (a) Lamellar tearing surfaces at the exposed plate edge. (b) Redesigned joint More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Lamellar tearing at root of weld for shroud-support ring. More
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