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Superalloy

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003120
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Superalloys are nickel, iron-nickel, and cobalt-base alloys generally used for high-temperature applications. Superalloys are used in aircraft, industrial, marine gas turbines, nuclear reactors, spacecraft structures, petrochemical production, orthopedic and dental prostheses...
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 27 AEM-EDS spectra collected from the iron-base superalloy Haynes Alloy 556. (a) Bright-field image of precipitates that decorate the grain boundaries. (b) and (c) show EDS spectra from the matrix and particles, respectively. Iron, chromium, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 39 AEM analysis of an iron-base superalloy. (a) η-Ni 3 Ti platelets. (b) Electron diffraction pattern in nearby γ matrix at zero specimen tilt. Zone axis is close to [001] γ . More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 Example of grains in a wrought superalloy material. Hastelloy X is shown with frequent twinning due to imparted strains. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5 Recrystallized grains on a nickel-base superalloy after surface deformations due to processes such as grinding. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 12 Gamma prime (γ′) phase in superalloy forging (Astroloy) at three different magnifications. (a) The forging was solution annealed at 1150 °C (2100 °F) for 4 h, air cooled, aged at 1080 °C (1975 °F) for 4 h, oil quenched, aged at 845 °C (1550 °F) for 4 h, air cooled, aged at 760 °C (1400 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 3 Archetypical microstructures of aluminide coatings on a nickel superalloy. (a) Inward diffusion based on Ni 2 Al 3 (and aluminum-rich NiAl). (b) Same as (a) but heat treated at 1080 °C (1975 °F). (c) Outward diffusion of nickel in nickel-rich NiAl. (d) Inward diffusion of aluminum More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 5 Chromium diffusion coatings on a nickel superalloy by (a) pack cementation and (b) out-of-contact gas-phase processing. Both at 500×. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Isothermal superalloy forging More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 36 Average low-cycle fatigue life for a PM superalloy during 1980 through 1996 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Hot isostatic pressing densification maps for a nickel-base superalloy powder having a particle diameter of 50 µm (2 mils). (a) Density as a function of pressure (pressure expressed as the log of the ratio of applied hydrostatic pressure over flow stress) when processed at constant More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 41 Example of quench cracking in a powder metallurgy superalloy disk rim More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 7 Strength (hardness) versus particle diameter in a nickel-base superalloy. Cutting occurs at low particle diameters, bypassing at higher particle diameters. Note also that aging temperature affects strength in conjunction with particle size. More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 12 Nitrogen content versus depth for Inconel nickel-base superalloy heated at 815 °C (1500 °F) in nitrogen More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 6 As-cast structure of Co-Cr-W-Ta superalloy (MAR-M 509). (a) The structure consists of metal carbide (MC) particles in script form and M 23 C 6 particles in eutectic form (gray areas) and precipitate form in the dendritic alpha solid-solution matrix. (b) Higher magnification reveals More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 7 As-cast microstructure of Co-Cr-W-Ta superalloy (MAR-M 302). (a) Structure at 100× reveals primary or eutectic M 6 C carbides (dark gray) and MC particles (small white crystals in solid-solution matrix). (b) At higher magnification (500×), the mottled gray islands are primary eutectic More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 15 Flow diagram of processes widely used to produce superalloy components. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 17 Gas atomization system for superalloy powder production. (a) Atomization nozzle. (b) Typical system. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 18 Soluble gas atomization system for producing superalloy powder. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 The evolution of the processing of nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. (a) From left, equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal blades. (b) An exposed view of the internal cooling passages of an aircraft turbine blade. Source: Ref 5 More