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Steel bolt

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 A noncompatible metal bushing in contact with a stainless steel bolt and other adjacent metal surfaces if left uncorrected may corrode away and weaken the connection. Courtesy of the NRPA NPSI More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Fatigue fracture of a steel bolt. Interpretation of the surface indicates that loading was primarily by unidirectional bending. However, secondary origins (C and D) indicate the possibility that a small reversed bending or backlash may have been present. Many closely spaced origins More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 26 Side views of four types of ASTM A490 high-strength steel bolt tensile specimens. See also Fig. 27 . Left to right: bolts 1, 4, 6, and 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 96 Broken 25-mm (1-in.) diam AISI 1040 steel bolt. (a) Macrograph of fracture surface; corrosion products obscure most of the surface. 2×. Intergranular secondary cracks (b) were observed in the region near the surface of the bolt shown by the arrow in (a). The bolt was not tempered More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 164 River pattern on cleavage fracture surface of low-carbon steel bolt. When a crack crosses a twist boundary, many small parallel cracks may form with cleavage steps between them. These steps run together, forming larger ones and leading to the river patterns characteristic of cleavage More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 32 Fatigue fracture of a steel bolt. Interpretation of the surface indicates that loading was primarily by unidirectional bending. However, secondary origins (C and D) indicate the possibility that a small reversed bending or backlash may have been present. Many closely spaced origins More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 4 Stainless steel bolt before and after tensile test, just before final failure More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 8 (a) Beach marks on a steel bolt. (b) Smooth fatigue portion of fracture profile in a metallographic mount of a steel fastener. Nital etch. (c) Scanning electron microscope image showing fatigue striations More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 8 Hardness distribution for eight lots of 1038 steel bolts. Bolts, 13 mm ( 1 2 in.) in diameter, were all made from one heat of steel. The bolts were heat treated in one plant to eight different levels of nominal hardness. Tests were made in the originating plant and in seven More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Fatigue data for 1040 and 4037 steel bolts. The bolts ( 3 8 by 2 in., 16 threads to the inch) had a hardness of 35 HRC. Tensile properties of the 1040 steel at three-thread exposure were yield strength, 1060 MPa (154 ksi); tensile strength (axial), 1200 MPa (175 ksi); tensile More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Fatigue limits for roll-threaded steel bolts. (a) Four different lots of bolts that were roll threaded, then heat treated to average hardness of 22.7, 26.6, 27.6, and 32.6 HRC. (b) Five different lots that were heat treated to average hardnesses of 23.3, 27.4, 29.6, 31.7, and 33.0 HRC More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 4137 steel bolts (hardness: 42 HRC) that failed by hydrogen-assisted SCC caused by acidic chlorides from a leaking polymer solution. (a) Overall view of failed bolts. (b) Longitudinal section through one of the failed bolts in (a) showing multiple, branched hydrogen-assisted stress More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 27 Deep pitting attack was discovered on steel bolts used to retain parts in a metal-shaping (cutting) machine. The surfaces of the bolts were covered with a black, oily substance, which, on analysis, was found to contain sulfurous species. Other steel parts also failed by pitting attack More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Microstructures of stainless steel bolts that failed from SCC. (a) Branched intergranular cracking in a type 410 stainless steel bolt from lot 1 (see Example 4 ). Etched with picral plus HCl. 250×. (b) Microstructure of a type 416 stainless steel bolt typical of those in lots 2 and 3 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 93 Example of quench cracks on the head of AISI 1040 steel bolts. Cracks were caused by incomplete development of the case. (a) Bolt heads at 0.72×; cracks accentuated using magnetic particles. (b) Quench crack near a corner. Etched with 2% nital. 54×. (c) Opened quench crack with arrows More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 9 Microstructures of stainless steel bolts that failed from stress-corrosion cracking. (a) Branched intergranular cracking in a type 410 stainless steel bolt from lot 1 (see Example 4). Etched with picral plus HCl. Original magnification: 250×. (b) Microstructure of a type 416 stainless More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 4340 steel wing-attachment bolt that cracked along a seam. (a) Bolt showing crack (arrows) along entire length. (b) Branching cracks (arrows) at head-to-shank radius. (c) Head of bolt showing cracking (arrows) about halfway through bolt-head diameter. (d) Section through bolt showing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 AISI type 431 stainless steel T-bolt that failed by SCC. (a) T-bolt showing location of fracture. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Fracture surface of the bolt showing shear lip (arrow A), fine-grain region (arrow B), and oxidized regions (arrows C). (c) Longitudinal section through More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 8 The 4340 steel wing-attachment bolt that cracked along a seam. (a) Bolt showing crack (arrows) along entire length. (b) Branching cracks (arrows) at head-to-shank radius. (c) Head of bolt showing cracking (arrows) approximately halfway through bolt-head diameter. (d) Section through More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 9 The incorrect choice of a carbon steel retaining bolt for a stainless steel spindle resulted in localized galvanic corrosion of the paddle-stirrer assembly ( Fig. 3 ). More