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Steam turbines

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004155
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract The steam turbine is the simplest and most efficient engine for converting large amounts of heat energy into mechanical work. This article discusses the primary corrosion mechanisms such as corrosion fatigue, stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), pitting, corrosion, and erosion-corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... Abstract This article illustrates typical wear and friction issues encountered in gas and steam turbines and their consequences as well as commonly adopted materials solutions. It contains tables that present the summary of wear and friction related issues encountered in steam turbines and gas...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Two portions of a modified type 403 stainless steel steam turbine blade damaged by liquid impingement erosion. The portion at left was protected by a shield of 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick rolled Stellite 6B brazed onto the leading edge of the blade; the portion at right was unprotected More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Surface appearance at low magnification of a steam turbine blade eroded by water droplets. (a) 12% Cr steel blade material. (b) Stellite 6B shield More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Electrical wear on the surface of a thrust bearing from a steam turbine. The microscopic pitting is caused by sparking from electric current. Actual size More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Copper alloy C26000 steam-turbine condenser tube that failed by dezincification. (a) Section through condenser tube showing dezincification of inner surface. 3 1 2 ×. (b) Etched specimen from the tube showing corroded porous region at the top and unaffected region below. 100× More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 2 Loading of a large steam turbine generator bearing into a centrifugal babbitting machine. Courtesy of Pioneer Motor Bearing Company More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Loading of a large steam turbine generator bearing into a centrifugal Babbitting machine. Courtesy of Pioneer Motor Bearing Company More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Schematic illustration of a steam turbine showing key components and stages with wear related degradation issues. Source: Ref 8 , 9 , 10 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Two portions of a modified type 403 stainless steel steam turbine blade damaged by liquid impingement erosion. The portion at left was protected by a 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick shield made of rolled Stellite 6B brazed onto the leading edge of the blade; the portion at right was unprotected More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 10 Photograph of an opened stress-corrosion crack in a steam turbine rotor disk. SCC, stress-corrosion cracking More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 13 Photograph of an opened stress-corrosion crack in a steam turbine disk. Dashed line highlights the crack-arrest mark observed on the fracture surface. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 25 Photograph of a cross section removed from the steam turbine disk. Stress-corrosion cracking (arrows) initiated at the blade root lands of the blade attachment. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 27 Micrographs of stress-corrosion cracking in a steam turbine rotor disk. Original magnification: (a) 100× and (b) 500×. Micrograph in (b) is a magnified view of the area within the box in (a). More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 12 Electrical wear on the surface of a thrust bearing from a steam turbine. The microscopic pitting is caused by sparking from electric current. Actual size More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 12 (a) Photograph showing one of the intact steam turbine blades from the failed stage. The arrow indicates the fracture location. (b) Photograph of the fracture surface. Scale: millimeters. (c) Scanning electron fractograph of the initiation region showing a mixed transgranular More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 16 Liquid droplet erosion from a low-pressure steam turbine blade that failed under fatigue loading. (a) Photograph of leading-edge airfoil, suction side. The lower portion of the airfoil (left) was 400-series stainless steel alloy; the upper portion of the airfoil (right) was clad More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 6 Copper alloy C26000 steam-turbine condenser tube that failed by dezincification. (a) Section through condenser tube showing dezincification of inner surface. Original magnification: 3.5×. (b) Etched specimen from the tube showing corroded porous region at the top and unaffected region More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract The corrosion issues in the compressor, combustor and turbine sections of industrial gas turbines used in steam production generally depend on the quality of the fuel, air, and water used in the engine than on the specific industrial application. This article focuses on the forms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006824
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... Abstract This article focuses on common failures of the components associated with the flow path of industrial gas turbines. Examples of steam turbine blade failures are also discussed, because these components share some similarities with gas turbine blading. Some of the analytical methods...