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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 36 (a) Surface of Ti-6Al-4V bar with seams. (b) Section through seams showing oxide and blunt tips. Kroll’s etch More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 19 Catalytic converter assembly consisting of seams joined by the nonvacuum electron beam welding process More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 23 Examples of (a) hems and seams and (b) hemming die set More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Hems and seams More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Special punches and dies for producing lock seams in a press brake More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Two methods of high-frequency welding of longitudinal seams in tubing. (a) Sliding contacts introduce current to the tube edges. (b) Multiturn induction coil induces current to the tube edges. More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 99 Fractures in AISI 5160 wire springs that originated at seams. (a) Longitudinal fracture originating at a seam. (b) Fracture origin at a very shallow seam, the arrow indicates the base of the seam. (J.H. Maker, Associated Spring) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 19 Catalytic converter assembly consisting of seams joined by EBW-NV process More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 34 (a) Seams and (b) slivers caused in rolled material by the presence of surface inclusions. Courtesy of V. Demski, Teledyne Rodney Metals More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 34 Rust-colored streaks transverse to horizontal weld seams in the sidewall of a type 316L stainless steel tank. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 5 Micrographs of cracks after heat treatment caused by seams in the steel. (a) Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) 8630 steel as-quenched; microstructure is martensite where cracking initiated from rolling seam (b) SAE type 403 stainless steel as-quenched and tempered; microstructure More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005608
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article describes the process applications, advantages, and limitations of resistance seam welding. The fundamentals of lap seam welding are also reviewed. The article details the types of seam welds, namely, lap seam welds and mash seam welds, and the processing equipment used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001365
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Resistance seam welding (RSEW) is a process in which the heat generated by resistance to the flow of electric current in the work metal is combined with pressure to produce a welded seam. This article discusses the various classes of the RSEW process, namely roll spot welding...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 11 Process variations of seam welding. (a) Lap seam welding. (b) Mash seam welding. (c) Metal finish seam welding. (d) Electrode wire seam welding. (e) Foil butt seam welding More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 26 Seam in rolled 4130 steel bar (a) Closeup of seam. Note the linear characteristics of this flaw. (b) Micrograph showing cross section of the bar. Seam is normal to the surface and filled with oxide. 30× More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 17 Muffler lock seam constructions. The double-lock seam construction (right) helps prevent liquid penetration between the wraps. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 18 Diagrams of seam and mash seam welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 (a) Lap seam weld, (b) mash seam weld with flat electrodes, and (c) mash seam weld with radiused (contoured) electrodes. Flat electrodes in mash seam welding should not be used when sheet thickness is less than 1mm (0.040 in.). Radiused electrodes can be used for sheet thicker than 1mm More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 9 Seam in rolled 4130 steel bar. (a) Closeup of seam. Note the linear characteristics of this flaw. (b) Micrograph showing cross section of the bar. Seam is normal to the surface and filled with oxide. Original magnification: 30× More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 22 Sketch of a split-return inductor for seam annealing straight welded steel tubes. Source: Ref 18 More