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Rail steel

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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Scanning electron micrograph showing pearlite in a rail steel eutectoid composition. Courtesy of F. Zia-Ebrahimi More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Flow under repeated impact for several manganese steels and for rail steel at different hardnesses. Specimens 25 mm (1 in.) in both diameter and length were struck repeatedly by blows with an impact energy of 680 J (500 ft · lbf). Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 2 Microstructure of a typical fully pearlitic rail steel showing the characteristic fine pearlite interlamellar spacing. 2% nital + 4% picral etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 17 A CCT diagram of a typical rail steel (composition: 0.77% C, 0.95% Mn, 0.22% Si, 0.014% P, 0.017% S, 0.10% Cr). Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Wear coefficient map for BS11 rail steel (relevant dimensionless K values in the inset are to be multiplied by 10 −4 ). Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 3 Microstructure of a typical fully pearlitic rail steel showing the characteristic fine pearlite interlamellar spacing. 2% nital + 4% picral etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 18 A CCT diagram of a typical rail steel (composition: 0.77% C, 0.95% Mn, 0.22% Si, 0.014% P, 0.017% S, 0.010% Cr). Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 14 TTT characteristics of rail steels More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and cast irons, the microstructural constituents have the names ferrite, pearlite, bainite, martensite, cementite, and austenite. The article presents four examples that have very different microstructures: the structural steel has a ferrite plus pearlite microstructure; the rail steel has a fully...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002461
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... of microstructural change in rail steels, cast iron, and steel sheet. It contains tables that list the mechanical properties and compositions of selected steels. The article also discusses the basis of material selection of irons and steels. austenite bainite cast iron cementite chemical composition...
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 11 Transverse fracture of an AISI 1075 steel railroad rail. Fracture nucleus (dark area near top of railhead) initiated a fatigue crack (large light area around nucleus). More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Schematic distribution of fatigue lives for 64 steel rail samples at a single stress level More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Carbon steel rail thermite weld. (a) Macrostructure. (b) Weld material. 65×. (c) Fusion line area. 65×. (d) Heat-affected zone. 65×. (e) Unaffected rail area. 65× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 308 Deep “shell crack” and “detail fracture” in head of railroad rail removed from service. Composition of standard carbon rail steel: 0.60 to 0.82% C, 0.70 to 1.00% Mn, and 0.10 to 0.23% Si. Gage side of rail is at left. A 5- to 10-mm ( 1 4 - to 3 8 -in.) thick layer More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 16 Relationship between hardness and wear resistance (weight loss) for rail steels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 15 Relationship between hardness and wear resistance (weight loss) for rail steels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 Relationship between pearlite interlamellar spacing and wear resistance (weight loss) for rail steels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 16 Relationship between pearlite interlamellar spacing and wear resistance (weight loss) for rail steels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 316 Photomicrograph shows typical lamellar pearlite structure in railroad rail steel (0.69 to 0.82% C). The interlamellar spacing is approximately 300 nm. This structure is sometimes mistaken for fatigue crack growth striations in SEM and TEM fractographs (see Fig. 311 , 312 , 313 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000607
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
...-type spring, railroad rail, and seamless drill pipe. driveshaft fatigue crack propagation fatigue fracture fractograph grain boundaries high-carbon steel hydrogen embrittlement microstructure springs Fig. 245 Surface of a fatigue fracture that occurred, after 732 h of service...