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Needle bearings

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 33 Variation in bearing pathway diameter of a needle bearing cup drawn using high-speed tool steel and carbide dies More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 59 (a) Drawn-cup needle bearing that failed by gross overload. As the cup increased in width under overload, the oil hole became elongated, and circumferential cracks developed in the outer surface. (b) Another case of axial overload showing circumferential cracks of the outer cup More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Bearings that were damaged by corrosive fluids. (a) Drawn cup for a needle-roller bearing damaged by vibration in the presence of dirt and moisture. Roller spacing is indicated by polished indentations. (b) and (c) Corrosion or water etch on bearing components resulting from a defective More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 31 Bearings that were damaged by corrosive fluids. (a) Drawn cup for a needle-roller bearing damaged by vibration in the presence of dirt and moisture. Roller spacing is indicated by polished indentations. (b, c) Corrosion or water etch on bearing components resulting from a defective More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Drawn-cup needle-roller bearing that failed by gross overload. As the cup increased in width under overload, the oil hole became elongated, and circumferential cracks developed in the outer surface. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 38 Severe case of false Brinelling in a needle cage rolling-element bearing More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 4 Schematics of typical radial roller bearing configurations. (a) Cylindrical roller elements. (b) Cross section of a tapered roller bearing. (c) Typical configuration of a radial spherical roller bearing. (d) Radial needle roller bearing with machined ring for the cage. (e) Radial needle More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 30 Bearings that failed because of wear by abrasive material in the bearing. (a) Needle-roller bearing. Note that flats have been worn onto the rollers. (b) Abrasive wear caused by natural diamond dust (≤5 μm) that was deliberately introduced into the lubricant in the laboratory. Deep More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Bearings that failed because of wear by abrasive material in the bearing. (a) Needle-roller bearing. Note that flats have been worn on the rollers. (b) Abrasive wear caused by natural diamond dust (≤5 μm) that was deliberately introduced into the lubricant in the laboratory. Deep More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Principal components of rolling-element bearings. Note that the tapered roller bearing is only one example of roller geometry. Other geometries include radial roller, needle, and spherical. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 38 Severe damage from fretting (false Brinelling) on the surface of a shaft that served as the inner raceway for a needle-roller bearing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Severe damage from fretting (false brinelling) on the surface of a shaft that served as the inner raceway for a needle-roller bearing. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 44 Severe damage from fretting (false Brinelling) on the surface of a shaft that served as the inner raceway for a needle-roller bearing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Damage from surface deterioration and spalling in the drawn-cup outer raceway of a needle-roller bearing because the rollers were overloaded at one end. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 49 Damage from surface deterioration and spalling in the drawn-cup outer raceway of a needle-roller bearing because the rollers were overloaded at one end (misalignment may be a potential root cause) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006426
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
.... The various types are illustrated in Fig. 2 . Fig. 2 Principal components of rolling-element bearings. Note that the tapered roller bearing is only one example of roller geometry. Other geometries include radial roller, needle, and spherical. Radial Ball Bearings The rolling elements...
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Published: 01 December 2004
eutectic of tin and antimony compounds and a continuous lead phase. (e) and (f) A bearing metal (86% Sn, 4% Cu, 10% Sb; hardness, 21 HV). Large cuboids of a tin-antimony compound, needle-shaped particles of a copper-tin compound, and smaller particles of these compounds in a matrix of tin phase. All More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... by the rotation of these elements. Bearing raceways that conform closely to the shape of the rolling elements are normally used to house the rolling elements.The rolling elements are usually positioned within the bearing by a retainer, cage, or separator; in ball bearings of the filling-slot type and in needle...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006834
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... of the REB. Those classes correspond nearly to the grades PN, P6, P5, P4, and P2 of ISO 492 and ISO 199 (or DIN 620-T2 and DIN 620-T3). Cylindrical roller bearings have rollers with approximate length-to-diameter ratios of 1:1 to 3:1. Needle roller bearings have cylindrical rollers (needles) with greater...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003778
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
...; hardness, 26 HV). Primary lead dendrite in a ternary eutectic of tin and antimony compounds and a continuous lead phase. (e) and (f) A bearing metal (86% Sn, 4% Cu, 10% Sb; hardness, 21 HV). Large cuboids of a tin-antimony compound, needle-shaped particles of a copper-tin compound, and smaller particles...