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Nd:YAG lasers

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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 19 Laser-nitrided titanium-alloy samples using a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser at different laser energy densities. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Pulsed Nd:YAG laser-beam weld exhibiting severe solidification cracking as a consequence of primary austenite solidification, Cr eq /Ni eq = 1.6. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Pulsed Nd:YAG laser weld in Al-8Fe-2Mo sheet. (a) Transverse section. (b) Plan view. (c) TEM microstructure of the light-etching regions near the fusion boundary with base alloy. Arrows in (a) and (b) indicate curvilinear bands bounding successive melt zones. Arrow in (c) indicates More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Solidification crack in a pulsed Nd:YAG laser weld joining Hastelloy C-276 to 17-4 PH stainless steel. YAG, yttrium-aluminum-garnet More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 7 SEM surface image of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds in high-boron alloy 214. (a) Solidification cracking. (b) Crater cracking More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 SEM surface image of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds in low-boron content alloy 214. (a) Solidification cracking. (b) Crater cracking More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 7 Schematic of a neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser setup. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 23 Micrographs of the Nd:YAG laser-assisted high-entropy alloy (HEA) coatings on aluminum: (a) 21 J/mm 2 single-layer coating, (b) 21 J/mm 2 double-layer coating, (c) 25 J/mm 2 double-layer coating, and (d) to (f) corresponding transformation in morphology of HEA phases by controlling More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 2 Drill time with a Nd:YAG laser. Workpiece: Inconel 718; pulse energy, 40 J More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 14 Signals from overlap welding of steel at 2000 W with an Nd:YAG laser More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Typical Nd:YAG laser design More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... Abstract Cutting with lasers is accomplished with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers. This article provides a description of the process variables and principles of laser cutting. It discusses the three basic types of CO 2 gas lasers, namely, slow...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002168
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... for using one type of laser over another. Carbon dioxide lasers are capable of delivering much higher average power than Nd:YAG lasers. As such, CO 2 lasers can cut faster and produce deeper weld penetration than Nd:YAG lasers. Pulsed Nd:YAG lasers develop a high pulse energy that allows percussion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001398
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of the two. Among the vast array of currently available lasers, the preferred systems for industrial soldering applications are the CO 2 laser, which emits at a wavelength of 10.6 μm, and the Nd:YAG laser, which emits at a wavelength of 1.06 μm. The total energy emitted by these lasers (or by any laser...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005680
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... are oscillated in the resonator, with the possibility of inducing stimulated emission, from which a coherent photon is created ( Ref 10 ). Further populating monochromatic and unidirectional photons produces the highly energetic laser suitable for welding. Small-Scale Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding High...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 SHADOW-like weld of tool steel-pinned lithographed, electroplated, and molded (LIGA) nickel parts rotated under single pulse from neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. 1.3 revolutions during 10 ms and 15 J pulse. Source: Ref 50 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Plot of weld penetration versus welding speed as a function of welding mode, mode of operation, and average output for Nd:YAG lasers at a wavelength of 1.06 μm (41.7 μin.). Source: Ref 12 Curve Welding mode Average output, W Pulsed Continuous wave A Penetration 400 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001370
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... applications where conventional technology was unable to provide reliable joining. The availability of high-power continuous-wave (CW) carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers and the limitations of current welding technology have promoted interest in deep-penetration...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... intensity distribution Types of Lasers Lasers are mainly divided into four types based on the medium in which they are used: solid-state lasers, gas lasers, semiconductor lasers, and dye lasers. For laser-assisted machining, mainly Nd:YAG (a solid-state laser) and CO 2 gas lasers are used...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Key components of a face-pumped Nd:YAG solid-state laser incorporating a slab crystal. (a) Front view. (b) End view (cross section) More