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Missiles

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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 29 Two designs of an ordnance missile tank bulkhead forging, (a) and (b), showing parting line locations and their effect on grain flow. Contours of the bulkhead after machining are shown in phantom. See Example 7. Dimensions in figure given in inches Item Revised forging More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 48 Aft closure, for a guided missile, that was superplastically formed at 815 °C (1500 °F) from a 1.6% C ultrahigh-carbon steel. The processing procedure consisted of warm pressing (800 °C, or 1470 °F) liquid-atomized powders into a billet and forging the resulting billet into plate More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 17 Molded PBI missile nose cone for greater than Mach 4 service More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Rain erosion effects on a Maverick missile dome made of coated zinc sulfide that was exposed for 10 s at a speed of approximately 210 m/s (690 ft/s). The dome itself suffered catastrophic damage, and erosion is also seen on the filled elastomeric mounting ring. Courtesy of G.F. Schmitt More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003438
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... on Composite Materials; his employer, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control–Orlando, which supported his efforts in writing this article and organizing and editing this Section; and particularly, Mr. John Adelmann of Sikorsky Aircraft, his former co-chair in the MIL-HDBK-17 PMC Testing Working Group...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003425
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Examples of spin-forged aluminum alloy shapes. (a) Ordnance ogive. (b) Ordnance center section. (c) Ordnance fuse. (d) Jet engine spinner. (e) Missile nose cone. (f) Missile center section. (g) Bottle. (h) Missile forward case More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 10 Examples of spin-forged aluminum alloy shapes. (a) Ordnance ogive. (b) Ordnance center section. (c) Ordnance fuse. (d) Jet engine spinner. (e) Missile nose cone. (f) Missile center section. (g) Bottle. (h) Missile forward case More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003475
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract This article discusses composites for unmanned space vehicles and provides an overview of key design drivers, challenges, and environment for use of composites in spacecraft, launch vehicles, and missiles. It describes the design allowable properties of composite materials. The article...
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 5 Ti-5Al-2.5Sn stress-corrosion cracking in distilled water. Source: T.L. Mackay and C.B. Gilpin, “Stress Corrosion Cracking of Titanium Alloys at Ambient Temperature in Aqueous Solutions,” Missile & Space Systems Division, Astropower Laboratory, Douglas Aircraft Company, Report SM More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Components produced from prealloyed titanium powder, using HIP and the ceramic mold process. (a) Nacelle frame for F14A, Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn, (b) radial impeller for F107 cruise missile engine, Ti-6Al-4V, (c) complex airframe component for the stealth bomber, Ti-6Al-4V, and (d) engine mount More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 16 Prealloyed HIP Ti-6Al-4V aerospace parts produced by the Crucible ceramic mold method. (a) F-14 fighter plane fuselage brace. (b) F-18 fighter plane engine mount support fitting. (c) Cruise missile engine impeller. (d) Four-section welded nacelle frame structure. (e) Titanium aluminide More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 15 Aerospace and automotive Ti-6Al-4V components produced by the BE method. (a) Impeller. (b) F-18 higher plane pivot fitting. (c) Missile housing. (d) Lens housings. (e) Prototype for a 100% dense airframe component. (f) Net-shape 35 mm (1 3 8 in.) diam mirror hub. (g More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003091
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article presents a detailed account on the process flow, composition, alternative sources, and the advancement of ironmaking, steelmaking and secondary steelmaking practices. Some steels, such as bearing steels, heat-resistant steels, ultrahigh strength missile and aircraft steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... fuel cells, and missile components. This article discusses high-temperature corrosion in boilers, diesel engines, gas turbines, and waste incinerators. Boilers are affected by stress rupture failures, waterside corrosion failures, fireside corrosion failures, and environmental cracking failures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004129
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... equipment went from labs, banks, and offices to aircraft, tanks, ships, and missiles. These pieces of equipment experience the cold of winter, the heat of the desert, the salt spray of the ocean, the moisture-condensing conditions of landing aircraft, or the pressure spray washing conditions...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... include more than 350,000 ground and tactical vehicles, 15,000 aircraft, 1000 strategic missiles, 300 ships, and facilities worth roughly $435 billion (U.S.). Since the military does not choose where its next battle must be fought, military assets must perform reliably and effectively at the extremes...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006730
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... uses include cryogenic storage tanks, unfired pressure vessels, ordnance tanks, missile structures, and low-temperature processing equipment. Available forms include plate, forgings, extrusions, and sheet. Composition limits of aluminum alloy 7039 Table 1 Composition limits of aluminum alloy...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006698
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... equipment; missile components; and armor plate. In 2003, the European Union introduced new requirements for alloys to meet higher standards of puncture resistance in the road transportation of hazardous goods such as gasoline. The alloys 5083- and 5086-H111 could not meet the new requirements, primarily due...