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Microbial induced corrosion

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Microbially induced corrosion showing striations in the bottom and tunneling into the walls of overlapping pits, as described in Ref 32 More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbially induced or influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials as an introduction to the recognition, management, and prevention of microbiological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004130
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... concentrate at interfaces, including soil/surface interfaces. A survey determined that the microbial populations measured on the surface of UXO were sufficient to cause localized corrosion and that the most likely mechanism was microbial acid production. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... of microbial activity and the corrosion process. Then, various mechanisms that influence corrosion in microorganisms are discussed. The focus is on the incremental activities needed to assess the role played by microorganisms, if any, in the overall scenario. The article presents a case study that illustrates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
..., microbiological, chemical, and electrochemical. It provides information on the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of irons and steels, passive alloys (austenitic stainless steels), aluminum alloys, copper alloys, and composites. The article reviews the formation of microbial biofilms and macrofouling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003670
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... coatings ( Ref 1 , 2 , 3 ). Microorganisms can therefore be viewed as catalytic entities, effectuating chemical reactions that would otherwise be negligible because of their high activation energy. Microorganisms, including the corrosion-inducing microorganisms, are present almost everywhere in soils...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003647
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Corrosion resulting from the presence and activities of microbes on metals and metal alloys is generally referred to as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). This article describes the biofilm formation and structure and microbial processes influencing corrosion. It also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... with bare metal in between, will be more likely to induce structurally significant corrosion than a film that produces a continuous and homogeneous layer. The general properties of ocean water and their effects on corrosion are discussed in the next section. The major and minor features, including...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003606
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... of atmospheric factors, climatic conditions, and air-chemical pollutants that determine the corrosiveness of the atmosphere and contribute to the metal corrosion process are discussed. The article reviews the phenomenon of precipitation runoff on the corroded metal surface and the corrosive microbial effect...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003656
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... high temperature Stagnant regions Surface and microstructural heterogeneities (e.g., manganese sulfide inclusions) Microbial activity While the early stages of localized corrosion processes are still not completely understood ( Ref 7 , 8 , 9 ), the stable growth of localized corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003651
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
.... The type of information sought during soil-induced corrosion evaluation controls the design configuration and the nature of the corrosion measurements. Consideration of these factors during the planning stage helps the corrosion engineer to obtain the maximum amount of information with the minimum number...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003844
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... into the paint. An electric potential applied across the coating film, such as cathodic protection or that resulting from a corrosion cell, can induce or accelerate the permeation of water into a coating. This phenomenon is called electroendosmosis. Additionally, corrosion-inhibiting pigments (chromates, borates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... potential will be oxidizing in nature, provided an aqueous solution materializes. The important environmental parameters affecting corrosion include container temperature, groundwater chemistry (including microbial activity), groundwater flow rate, hydrostatic and lithostatic pressure (which influences...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003969
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... and Water Drop Impingement) 326 Fatigue Forms of Mechanically Assisted Degradation (section on Corrosion Fatigue) 328 Environmentally induced cracking Stress-corrosion cracking Stress-Corrosion Cracking 346 Hydrogen damage Hydrogen Damage 367 Liquid metal embrittlement Liquid...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006822
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... Internal corrosion Top-of-the-line corrosion Underdeposit corrosion Microbial-influenced corrosion Stress-corrosion cracking High-pH stress-corrosion cracking Near-neutral-pH stress-corrosion cracking Hydrogen cracking Hydrogen-assisted cracking Hydrogen-induced cracking Stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... etching or plastic deformation or can be detected by eddy-current inspection. Corrosion fatigue cracking is often transgranular, but there is evidence that certain environments induce intergranular cracking in copper metals. Copper and copper alloys resist corrosion fatigue in many applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... crack propagation. Microbiologically Induced Corrosion Microbiologically induced corrosion manifests itself as pitting or intergranular corrosion. It is promoted by the presence of fungi ( Cladosporium resinae ) brought in by jet fuel. Figure 2(b) shows fungi responsible for microbial corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
...; WS, both sides; N, not a problem; w, small sensitivity on water side; s, small sensitivity on steam side. (b) Includes stress-corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement. (c) Possible problem only if sulfide present. (d) Problems have occurred in similar alloys. (e) Induced...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004213
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... are used rather loosely when describing the morphology of underground corrosion. The classical pitting often associated with passive metals (such as stainless steels) is typically not observed on underground pipelines, with the possible exception of cases where microbial activity is involved. Likewise...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004214
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
.... These efforts range from a predictive model that begins with CO 2 corrosion ( Ref 1 , 2 ), to models that focus on specific aspects of the corrosion phenomena (such as flow-induced corrosion or erosion-corrosion) ( Ref 3 , 4 ), to models that empirically relate corrosion rates to gas production and water...