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Investment castings

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Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005255
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article reviews the pattern materials used in investment casting, which can be loosely grouped into waxes and plastics. The patternmaking process, pattern tooling, and pattern and cluster assembly are described. The article also describes the manufacture of ceramic shell molds...
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 25 Examples of cored holes and cavities easily produced in investment castings More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Three investment castings that incorporate walls of less than recommended minimum thickness More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 14 Two investment castings that required tie bars to assure dimensional accuracy. In (a), a “standard” tie bar, which had to be removed after casting, added to the cost of production. In (b), the gate functioned also as a tie bar, and, since gate removal is a normal requirement More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 24 Examples of cored holes and cavities easily made in investment castings. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5 Some aircraft and aerospace applications for investment castings. (a) Single-crystal turbine blades investment cast using complex ceramic cores. Courtesy of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. (b) 17-4-PH stainless steel fan exit case; weight: 96 kg (212 lb). Courtesy of Precision Castparts More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Biomedical applications for investment castings. (a) Whiteside hip-femoral prosthesis. (b) Whiteside II-C knee-tibial base. (c) London elbow-humeral prosthesis. All cast in ASTM F75 cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy; all courtesy of Dow Corning Wright More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Miscellaneous applications for investment castings. (a) Nosepiece for nailgun cast in 8620 alloy steel. The part is used as-cast. Courtesy of Northern Precision Casting Company. (b) Ni-Resist Type II cast iron inducer for deep well oil drilling. Courtesy of Bimac Corporation. (c) Small More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 51 Minimum and recommended tolerances for steel investment castings on one side of parting line, as a function of the plan area of the casting More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 10 Hardness profile differences of pure titanium investment castings by four mold materials: Al 2 O 3 , ZrSiO 2 , ZrO 2 , and CaO-stabilized ZrO 2. These data indicate that alumina increases α-case depth. Adapted from Ref 10 , 14 , 15 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006519
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract Investment casting, in which molten metal is poured into hot molds, allows for the production of aluminum parts with extremely thin sections, knife edges and sharp detail. This article describes the various steps in the investment casting process, including patternmaking...
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 8 Basic steps in the investment casting process. See Fig. 9(a) for a close-up of an automated slurry coating process. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 (a) Automated slurry coating of an investment casting mold. (b) Cutaway view of a shell mold for an air-cooled turbine blade casting. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 23 Depth profile for an investment cast pump impeller that had essentially no metal removed from the surface. The chromium/iron ratio is low (0.06), and the metal does not meet nominal composition until a depth of 350 nm is reached. This surface will be subject to corrosion and cavitation More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 24 Investment cast impeller surface roughened by cavitation/erosion in water for injection service. The white ridges are harder delta ferrite, and the dark areas are the softer interdendritic austenite. Original magnification 100× More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 Example of rapid prototyping process with investment casting. (a) Valve body prototype prepared for investment casting manufacturing without hard tooling. (b) Soft tooling for production investment casting mold. (c) Final casting. With rapid tooling, metal casting has developed More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 Comparison of Ti-6Al-4V investment cast test bars subjected to various thermal and hydrogen treatments. Smooth axial fatigue measured at room temperature. R = +0.1; frequency = 5 Hz using triangular wave form. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 11 Investment cast titanium components for use in corrosive environments More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 12 Investment cast titanium airframe parts More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 13 Typical investment cast titanium components used for gas turbine applications More