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Intergranular fracture

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article briefly reviews the factors that influence the occurrence of intergranular (IG) fractures. Because the appearance of IG fractures is often very similar, the principal focus is placed on the various metallurgical or environmental factors that cause grain boundaries...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003540
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article briefly reviews the various metallurgical or environmental factors that cause a weakening of the grain boundaries and, in turn, influence the occurrence of intergranular (IG) fractures. It discusses the mechanisms of IG fractures, including the dimpled IG fracture, the IG...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Intergranular fracture surface showing partial intergranular wetting with both solid-solid and liquid-liquid bonding. 500× More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 12 Intergranular fracture from the overload fracture zone in the case of a carburized SAE 8620 steel. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrograph. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 29 Intergranular fracture observed in the fracture surface of martensitic ductile iron (ASTM A536, 120-90-02 grade) under slow bending test at room temperature (20 °C, or 68 °F). Different magnification. The fracture surface shows grain-boundary separation with inclusions located More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 44 Intergranular fracture mode within gray area of flaw. Crack growth direction is from bottom to top. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 39 SEM micrograph showing intergranular fracture in a nickel-chromium-molybdenum (HY80) steel. 315× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Mud cracks on the surface of an intergranular fracture in 7079-T651 aluminum that failed under SCC conditions in a 3.5% chloride solution. TEM replica More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 SEM images of intergranular fracture with different grain morphologies. (a) Rock candy appearance from atmospheric stress-corrosion cracking of a high-strength aluminum alloy with equiaxed grains. 130×. (b) Intergranular fracture along the part line of an aluminum forging More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 11 Intergranular fracture in case unstable crack propagation zone in gas-carburized and direct-cooled SAE 4320 steel. Courtesy of A. Reguly More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 21 Percent intergranular fracture, reduction of area, and strain to failure of iron, iron + phosphorus, and iron + phosphorus + manganese alloys tested at various cathodic potentials More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 22 Percent intergranular fracture and the normalized strain to failure plotted as a function of sulfur content at the grain boundary for straining electrode tests at a cathodic potential of −600 mV (SCE) More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 25 Percent intergranular fracture and reduction of area versus grain-boundary composition of nickel for several cathodic test potentials. C S is the critical sulfur concentration corresponding to 50% intergranular fracture. Points labeled P are equivalent sulfur concentrations More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 58 Corrosion products on the intergranular fracture surface of an Nb-106 alloy. These corrosion products, which are residues from acid cleaning, contributed to failure by SCC. (L. Kashar, Scanning Electron Analysis Laboratories, Inc.) More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 61 Intergranular fracture surface of an AISI 4140 low-alloy steel nut that failed because of embrittlement by liquid cadmium More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 101 SEM views of the corrosion products (a) and the intergranular fracture and secondary grain-boundary cracks (b) that were the result of the laps shown in Fig. 100 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 14 Intergranular fracture that was generated in a specimen of oxygen-embrittled Armco iron by a Charpy impact test at room temperature. The grain facets appear sharp and clean. Note the secondary cracks, which follow grain boundaries. See also Fig. 15 and 16 for views of other regions More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 540 Brittle intergranular fracture of AISI 9254 due to quench cracking. The crack initiated at a seam, 0.15 mm (0.006 in.) deep. The seam wall is the irregularly textured area at top in the fractograph. SEM, 200× (J.H. Maker, Associated Spring, Barnes Group Inc.) More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1070 TEM p-c replica of the surface of an intergranular fracture in an aircraft landing-gear component of forged aluminum alloy 7075-T6 that fractured as the result of stress-corrosion cracking. Note the secondary cracks between the grains. 1000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1234 A very clean intergranular fracture in sintered tungsten that was broken by impact. Note the several very flat separated-grain facets; small sintering pores can be seen in several of the facets. TEM p-c replica, 4000× More