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Induction hardening

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005865
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction heat treatment is a common method for hardening and tempering of crankshafts, which are necessary components in almost every internal combustion engine for cars, trucks, and machinery, as well as pumps, compressors, and other devices. Similar to crankshafts, camshafts also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005868
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction heat treating is used in the off-road machinery industry for hardening steel and cast iron components used in a wide range of applications. This article focuses on the usage of induction hardening components in the industry, and discusses the basic requirements of steel...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005869
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction hardening of geared parts used in aeronautic and aerospace industry is an important technology because of its one-piece flow, repeatability, energy efficiency, and tighter control of surface distortion than conventional carburizing. This article describes the requirements...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005867
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction hardening is a prominent method in the gear manufacturing industry due to its ability of selectively hardening portions of a gear such as the flanks, roots, and/or tips of teeth with desired hardness, wearing resistance, and contact fatigue strength without affecting...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005859
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract This article focuses on induction hardening process for heat treating operations specifically designed to result in proper microstructure/property combinations in either localized or in the final parts. It briefly reviews the heat treating basics for conventional heat treating...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005863
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction hardening of steel components is the most common application of induction heat treatment of steel. This article provides a detailed account of electromagnetic and thermal aspects of metallurgy of induction hardening of steels. It describes induction hardening techniques...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 18 Spin hardening is the most popular technique for induction hardening of gears with fine- and medium-size teeth. Courtesy of Inductoheat, Inc. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 24 Dual-frequency induction-hardening pattern. Courtesy of Contour Hardening, Inc. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005864
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract This article describes the common types of automotive and truck axle shafts. It provides information on steels used for induction-hardened shafts, and on the manufacturing and induction hardening methods of axle shafts. The article discusses the effects of case depth, shaft length...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 21 Induction hardening of a sprocket, where induction heating at relatively low frequency results in more intense heating in the root and some current cancellation in the tip. Courtesy of Inductoheat, Inc. More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 48 (a) Schematic of scan induction hardening and spray quench. (b) Distribution of martensite and residual stresses at the end of inner diameter (ID) and (c) outer diameter (OD) hardening processes. Source: Ref 93 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 26 In induction hardening, a design may have to provide a nonuniform section to even out the heating rate, as illustrated in this large, coarse pitch sprocket. More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 27 The problem of cracking in this part during induction hardening was solved by changing to drilling and tapping the part after hardening. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 29 Selective areas of a cup-shape component that required induction hardening. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 14 Hardness profiles for 1550 and 5150 steel after induction hardening for 1.0 s. Each steel was processed with two starting microstructures as described in the text. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 11 Typical scanning induction hardening setup for austenitizing and quenching More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 13 Coil for vertical scanning induction hardening with integral quench oriented at an angle to allow for heat soak before quenching. Courtesy of Induction Tooling, Inc. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 3 Radial and axial residual stress profiles after induction hardening the surface layer in the central part of a cylindrical steel rod. (a) During induction surface heating. (b) During quenching. D I , initial diameter; D A , diameter of heated austenite; D H , hardened diameter More
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