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Impingement erosion

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006378
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... Abstract Liquid impingement erosion has been defined as progressive loss of original material from a solid surface due to continued exposure to impacts by liquid drops or jets. This article focuses on the core nature of erosion by liquid impingement, due to the greater appreciation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006796
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract Erosion of a solid surface can be brought about by liquid droplet impingement (LDI), which is defined as "progressive loss of original material from a solid surface due to continued exposure to erosion by liquid droplets." In this article, the emphasis is placed on the damage mechanism...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 1 Liquid impingement erosion on the leading edge of a blade, caused by droplets of rain. (a) Scanning electron microscopy image showing a section cut from an ex-service blade. (b) Optical profilometry image. Normally, such erosion does not impair the function of the blade. More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 23 Solid-particle impingement erosion test (ASTM G76) results to compare cobalt-base alloys with selected alloys using a 250 to 300 μm (0.010 to 0.012 in.) diameter silicon carbide erodent at impact angles of 30, 60, and 90°. Tests conducted at room temperature with 60 m/s (200 ft/s More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 24 Solid-particle impingement erosion test (ASTM G76) results to compare cobalt-base alloys with selected alloys using a 75 to 200 μm (0.003 to 0.008 in.) diameter quartz erodent of impact angles of 30, 60, and 90°. Tests conducted at room temperature with 60 m/s (200 ft/s) particle More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 25 Solid-particle impingement erosion test (ASTM G76) results to compare cobalt-base alloys with selected alloys using a 50 μm (in.) alumina erodent of impact angles of 30 and 90°. Tests conducted at room temperature with 84 m/s (276 ft/s) particle velocity. Experimental high-molybdenum More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 26 Room-temperature solid-particle impingement erosion test (ASTM G76) results to compare cobalt-base alloys with selected alloys using a 400 μm (0.016 in.) mean diameter silicon carbide erodent at an impact angle of 60°. Test parameters: test temperature, 20 °C (70 °F); particle velocity More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 27 High-temperature solid-particle impingement erosion test (ASTM G76) results to compare cobalt-base alloys with selected alloys using an 80 μm (0.003 in.) mean diameter alumina erodent at an impact angle of 30°. Test parameters: test temperature, 850 °C (1560 °F); particle velocity, 20 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Processes by which a material is damaged by liquid impingement erosion. (a) Solid surface showing initial impact of a drop of liquid that produces circumferential cracks in the area of impact or produces shallow craters in very ductile materials. (b) High-velocity radial flow of liquid More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 8 Processes by which a material is damaged by liquid impingement erosion. (a) Solid surface showing initial impact of a drop of liquid that produces circumferential cracks in the area of impact or produces shallow craters in very ductile materials. (b) High-velocity radial flow of liquid More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003669
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Erosion, cavitation, and impingement are mechanically assisted forms of material degradation that often contribute to corrosive wear. This article identifies and describes several tests that are useful for ranking the service potential of candidate materials under such conditions...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Erosion rate (V u ) as a function of particle impingement energy (E k ) for uncoated carbon steel AISI 1020 and thermally sprayed WC LW45 on carbon steel as well as CVD coatings of diamond (20 µm thick) on WC-Ni and B4C (15 µm thick) on WC-Co. E k at 90° jet angle for water-sand jet More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3 Solid particle erosion dependency on impingement angle and ductility or brittleness of the coating More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 11 Relative erosion factors for selected ceramics at an impingement angle of 90°. Ratings based on using Stellite 6B cobalt-base alloy as the reference material. Source: Ref 71 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 4 Effect of angle of impingement on erosion rate for a ductile and brittle material, from Finnie ( Ref 22 ). Note: aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) data has been multiplied by 10 to better show the results. The line f(α) shows a projected model. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006795
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract Erosion is the progressive loss of original material from a solid surface due to mechanical interaction between that surface and a fluid, a multicomponent fluid, an impinging liquid, or impinging solid particles. The detrimental effects of erosion have caused problems in a number...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003568
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... is the progressive loss of original material from a solid surface due to mechanical interaction between that surface and a fluid, a multicomponent fluid, an impinging liquid, or impinging solid particles ( Ref 1 ). Erosion is a rather broad term and can be further classified into a number of more specific terms...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Two portions of a modified type 403 stainless steel steam turbine blade damaged by liquid impingement erosion. The portion at left was protected by a shield of 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick rolled Stellite 6B brazed onto the leading edge of the blade; the portion at right was unprotected More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Two portions of a modified type 403 stainless steel steam turbine blade damaged by liquid impingement erosion. The portion at left was protected by a 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick shield made of rolled Stellite 6B brazed onto the leading edge of the blade; the portion at right was unprotected More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Effect of impingement angle on erosive wear. Source: Ref 12 More