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Gibbs energy

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Published: 27 April 2016
Fig. 24 Use of Gibbs energy curves to construct a binary phase diagram that shows miscibility in both the liquid and solid states. Source: Ref 4 as published in Ref 3 More
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Published: 27 April 2016
Fig. 26 Use of Gibbs energy curves to construct a binary phase diagram of the eutectic type. Source: Ref 5 as published in Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Relation between the Gibbs energy curves of the liquid ( l ), α, and β phases More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 13 Use of Gibbs energy curves to construct a binary phase diagram that shows miscibility in both the liquid and solid states. Source: adapted from Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 14 Use of Gibbs energy curves to construct a binary phase diagram of the eutectic type. Source: adapted from Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 3 Given the Gibbs energies of the face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phases in a binary, shown in this figure at constant temperature and pressure, it becomes possible to calculate a metastable two-phase equilibrium, unless the software used is capable More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 4 (a) Given the Gibbs energies of two solution phases, α and β, and two stoichiometric intermetallic phases, γ and δ, at constant temperature and pressure, the heavy curve at the bottom of the Gibbs energies from pure A to B is the convex hull or the lowest Gibbs energies of the phases More
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005206
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article discusses the application of thermodynamic in the form of phase diagrams for visually representing the state of a material and for understanding the solidification of alloys. It presents the derivation of the relationship between the Gibbs energy functions and phase...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003588
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... of the standard Gibbs energy change of formation of oxides and the corresponding dissociation pressures of the oxides as a function of temperature. It demonstrates the Kellogg diagram which shows stability range in more complicated multioxidant systems. The article explains the determination of partial pressures...
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 32 (a) Gibbs free-energy composition diagram and (b) locus of solvus curves of metastable and stable equilibrium phases in a precipitation sequence. (a) The points of common tangency show the relationship between compositions of the matrix phase (C″, C′, and C eq ) and the various forms More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 17 (a) Gibbs free-energy composition diagram and (b) locus of solvus curves of metastable and stable equilibrium phases in a precipitation sequence. (a) The points of common tangency show the relationship between compositions on the matrix phase (C″, C′, and C eq ) and the various forms More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 31 Gibbs free-energy curves of α and β phases in titanium-molybdenum at different temperatures based on the newest Pandat database. c 0 = 2.78 wt% at 973 K (700 °C); c 0 = 4.66 wt% at 873 K (600 °C); and c 0 = 6.84 wt% at 773 K (500 °C) More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 33 Gibbs free-energy curves of α and β phases in titanium-molybdenum at 873 K (600 °C) based on the newest Pandat database ( c 0 = 4.66 wt%). There is a miscibility gap within the β phase, and the spinodal region is between c Mo = 28 to 71 wt%. The intersection between the free More
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Published: 27 April 2016
Fig. 12 Gibbs free-energy curves during solidification. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 27 April 2016
Fig. 1 Gibbs free energy for different atomic configurations in a system. Configuration A has the lowest free energy and therefore is the arrangement of stable equilibrium. Configuration B is in a state of metastable equilibrium. Adapted from Ref 1 More
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Published: 27 April 2016
Fig. 3 Variation of Gibbs free energy with temperature. Adapted from Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 5 Gibbs free-energy composition diagram (a) and locus of solvus curves (b) of metastable and stable equilibrium phases in a precipitation sequence. (a) The points of common tangency show the relationship between compositions of the matrix phase (C″, C′, and C eq ) and the various forms More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 3 Richardson-Jeffes diagram showing standard Gibbs free energy of formation as a function of temperature for metal oxide systems. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 19 Cluster variation method (CVM), cluster/site approximation (CSA), compound energy formalism (CEF), and modified CEF used as a function of temperature to calculate (a) Gibbs energies, (b) enthalpy, and (c) entropy for a face-centered cubic alloy with equal mole of the component element More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 1 Schematic diagram showing that a phase diagram can be calculated using thermodynamic relations, knowing the Gibbs energies of the phase involved. These values can be obtained from the enthalpies, specific heats, and the chemical potentials of the components obtained experimentally More