1-20 of 726 Search Results for

Fasteners

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001018
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... Abstract This article discusses the properties of threaded fasteners made from carbon and low-alloy steels containing a maximum of 0.55% carbon. It provides guidelines for the selection of steels for bolts, studs, and nuts intended for use at temperatures between -50 and 370 deg C. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001812
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article discusses different types of mechanical fasteners, including threaded fasteners, rivets, blind fasteners, pin fasteners, special-purpose fasteners, and fasteners used with composite materials. It describes the origins and causes of fastener failures and with illustrative...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003323
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... coefficient testing, torque tension testing, locknut testing, and angular ductility and rotational capacity tests. The article reviews the basic methods and fundamental principles for mechanical testing of externally and internally threaded fasteners and bolted joints. The test methods for externally threaded...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006805
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... Abstract This article first provides an overview of the types of mechanical fasteners. This is followed by sections providing information on fastener quality and counterfeit fasteners, as well as fastener loads. Then, the article discusses common causes of fastener failures, namely...
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 7 Failed Ti-6Al-4V shear fasteners. The fasteners were cadmium plated for galvanic compatibility with the aluminum structure. (a) Photograph showing failure at the head-to-shank fillet. (b) Intergranular fracture morphology. Failure was attributed to liquid-metal-induced embrittlement More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003427
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract This article focuses on the factors to be considered for selecting fasteners for joining carbon fiber composites. These considerations include corrosion compatibility, fastener materials, strength, stiffness, head configurations, importance of clamp-up, hole fit, and lightning...
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Corroded lap joint of 7075-T6 skin with 2017 fasteners. (a) Specimen from panel exposed in the ASTM CASS spray test show pillowing and attack of cladding. (b) Micrograph cross section show loss of cladding, but no loss to the 7075-T6 core. Original magnification: 200× More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Fasteners that appear solid at the ends may have hidden corrosion damage, such as the wasp-waisting of bilge fastenings. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 10 Galvanic corrosion of AZ91D caused by bare steel fasteners during a 10 day exposure to 5% NaCl salt spray. Source: Ref 18 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 21 Galvanic corrosion produced by dissimilar fasteners in AZ91D magnesium alloy. Reproduced from Ref 31 with permission of the International Magnesium Association, McLean, VA More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 26 Relative galvanic corrosion produced by dissimilar fasteners attached to AZ91D magnesium alloy (ASTM B 117 salt spray test). Source: Ref 34 , 35 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 32 Open-circuit potentials of plated steel and bare steel fasteners and die-cast AZ91D magnesium alloy against a Ag/AgCl reference electrode in 5% NaCl saturated with Mg(OH) 2 . Source: Ref 35 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers and spaces should be used to completely isolate the fastener. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Failed Ti-6AI-4V shear fastener. The fasteners were cadmium plated for galvanic compatibility with the aluminum structure. (a) Photograph showing failure at the head-to-shank fillet. (b) Intergranular fracture morphology. Failure was attributed to LMIE caused by excessive temperature More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Types of failures in threaded and blind fasteners and in fastened sheet. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Cracked HL22-8 aluminum alloy 7075-T6 fasteners. (a) and (b) Typical cracked fastener head. (c) Typical head cracks produced by installing fasteners in misaligned holes during testing More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 15 . More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Scanning electron micrograph of fracture surface of fasteners shown in Fig. 14 . 880× More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 21 Types of blind fasteners used in assembled components. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 26 Fatigue failure of fasteners in single-lop shear carbon-graphite composite joints. (a) Fastener pullout resulting from a static tensile load. (b) Fatigue failure of fasteners initiated by cocking of the fasteners. Both 1 1 3 × More