1-20 of 427 Search Results for

Fans

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 31 Fans. (a) Examples of fans in a two-stage TEM replica of a cleavage fracture surface of iron. The river lines point back to the crack initiation site. (b) Fans on SEM image. Source: Ref 44 , 46 More
Image
Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 3 Air-cooled tower with top fans. Courtesy of Dry Coolers Inc. More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 32 (a) Examples of fans in a two-stage transmission electron microscopy replica of a cleavage fracture surface of iron. The river lines point back to the crack initiation site. (b) Fans on scanning electron microscopy image. Source: Ref 20 , 22 More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 18 Corrosion fatigue of a fan shaft. (a) Profile view of the fractured fan shaft. (b) Overhead view of fracture surface showing the corroded region at the outside diameter and the fracture region (dashed line) on the shaft. Ratchet marks were visible around the edges of the fracture More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 10 Antifretting coating schematic and fan blade and disc. Source: Ref 20 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Life of sintered bronze bearings MKZ (Sint-B50) in fan motors with different lubrication as a function of temperature using increased volume of supplementary lubrication. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Forged Ti-6Al-4V jet engine fan disks are 890 mm (35 in.) in diameter and weigh 249 kg (548 lb). Courtesy of Wyman-Gordon Company More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Fretting fatigue damage along a titanium fan stage-2 blade dovetail experienced on F-400 engines More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 7 Methods of applying grinding fluids. (a) A fan-shaped nozzle covers the width of the wheel and is shaped to break the air film generated by the rotating wheel. (b) A nozzle with a large orifice extending over the sides of the wheel allows gradual acceleration of the fluid. (c) A nozzle More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 20 Slitting line with one rewinder showing fan-out problem More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 48 Large sheet metal fan that was clamped in a shaped blankholder during the second forming operation. Dimensions given in inches More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 The fan housing diecasting features wall thicknesses that range from 0.88 to 0.124 in. The interior view of the fan housing shows the slots of the base that provide paths for the forced air to exit close to the hot surface of the stove, picking up heat and moving down away from the fan. More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 12 The fan housing was cast in a three-plate die with a cold chamber gating system. Shown here is the cover half (left) and ejector half (right) of the die. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Macroscale radial marks. The fan array of the radial marks points back to the crack initiation site and is created under conditions of “rapid” crack propagation. Source: Ref 29 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 1040 steel fan shaft that fractured in reversed-bending fatigue. (a) Overall view of shaft. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Fracture surface showing diametrically opposed origins (arrows) More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Simulated flow of fluid through a fan-shaped gate (a) with a top connection to the runner and (b) with a bottom connection to the runner. Source: Ref 27 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 25 Machining distortions: fan vs. oil quench. Distortion data represent the average of the eight experimental measurements at 45° intervals. The data points (coordinate measurement machine, CMM) show all eight measurements and the extent of nonaxisymmetric distortion. DEFORM represents More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 46 Comparison of residual stresses in a disk for oil quenching, fan-plus-water cooling, and air-mist cooling. Stress contour levels (MPa): a = −600, b = −360, c = −120, d = 120, e = 360, and f = 600. Source: Ref 101 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 47 Turbine disk geometry and fan-cooling variables for model routine optimizing study. Source: Ref 108 . Reprinted with permission of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 29 Digital radiography mode. The component moves perpendicular to the fan beam, and the radiographic data are acquired line-by-line. More