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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Energy release during controlled explosions tests of different powders. hvb, high-volatile bituminous. Source: Ref 7 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005602
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of explosion welding (EXW), the process-material interactions, and the critical aspects or parameters that must be controlled. The procedure for ensuring the control of process parameters is also discussed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001376
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW) is a solid-state metal-joining process that uses explosive force to create an electron-sharing metallurgical bond between two metal components. This article discusses the process attributes of EXW, including metallurgical attributes, metal combinations, size...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), also known as explosive bonding, is accomplished by a high-velocity oblique impact between two metals. This article describes the practice of producing an explosive bond/weld and draws on many previous research results in order to explain the mechanisms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001449
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), like all other welding or joining processes, has a well defined set of input parameters or conditions that must fall within certain limits for the desired weld quality to be achieved. This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of EXW...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 4 Physical explosion (steam explosion) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Parallel-plate explosion welding process. (a) Explosion-cladding assembly before detonation. (b) Explosion-cladding assembly during detonation. (c) Close-up of (b) showing mechanism for jetting away the surface layer from the parent layer More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 22 Effect of aluminum powder particle size on explosibility. Shown by comparing lower explosion limit with the percentage of particles less than 200 mesh in size More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Example of a dust explosion. Courtesy of U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Dust explosion pentagon More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 18 Schematic illustration of the explosion welding process showing (a) the typical component arrangement and (b) the characteristic action between components during welding. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 19 Setup for deep-hole drilling an explosive forming die in a boring mill. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Schematic examples of typical explosive forming operations. (a) Sizing with a water-filled die cavity. (b) Method for forming a flat panel. (c) Use of detonation cord to prescribe the pressure distribution in an open forming system. (d) Use of detonation cord to form a cylinder. Open More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 17 Curved, corrugated panel produced by explosive forming from aluminum alloy 2014 0.51 mm (0.020 in.) thick. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Explosive forming of a case from 1.5 mm (0.060 in.) thick alloy A-286 sheet. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Alloy N-155 exit nozzle produced by tube spinning and explosive forming. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Bond zone pattern typical of explosion clad metals. Materials are type 304L stainless steel and medium-carbon steel. 20├Ś More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 44 Confined system for explosive forming More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 45 Unconfined system for explosive forming More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 21 The basic experimental setup for explosion-driven collapse of a metallic sample More