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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Energy release during controlled explosions tests of different powders. hvb, high-volatile bituminous. Source: Ref 7 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001376
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW) is a solid-state metal-joining process that uses explosive force to create an electron-sharing metallurgical bond between two metal components. This article discusses the process attributes of EXW, including metallurgical attributes, metal combinations, size...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005602
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of explosion welding (EXW), the process-material interactions, and the critical aspects or parameters that must be controlled. The procedure for ensuring the control of process parameters is also discussed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), also known as explosive bonding, is accomplished by a high-velocity oblique impact between two metals. This article describes the practice of producing an explosive bond/weld and draws on many previous research results in order to explain the mechanisms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001449
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), like all other welding or joining processes, has a well defined set of input parameters or conditions that must fall within certain limits for the desired weld quality to be achieved. This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of EXW...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 4 Physical explosion (steam explosion) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Parallel-plate explosion welding process. (a) Explosion-cladding assembly before detonation. (b) Explosion-cladding assembly during detonation. (c) Close-up of (b) showing mechanism for jetting away the surface layer from the parent layer More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 21 The basic experimental setup for explosion-driven collapse of a metallic sample More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Schematic of explosively loaded torsional Kolsky bar More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Loading end of explosively loaded torsional Kolsky bar More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Explosive-driven shock-loading assemblies. (a) Inclined-plate system. (b) Parallel-plate glass system. (c) Plane wave generator lens More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 24 Explosive-bonded 3.2 mm ( 1 8 in.) thick zirconium clad to 32 mm (1 1 4 in.) thick carbon steel plate. Attack polished, swab etched with 97% methanol and 3% HNO 3 , and heat tinted at 370 °C (700 °F). (a) Under bright-field illumination, the zirconium is brown-blue More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 27 Unalloyed tantalum/Nickel 201 explosively bonded bimetal; both materials 3.2 mm (0.125 in.) thick. Cold rolled to size and annealed. Scanning electron micrograph shows fully cold-worked tantalum (top) and fully recrystallized nickel (bottom). Etchant: ASTM 163 ( Table 1 ), then ASTM 24 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 51 Zirconium/steel explosive bonded area, attack polished, bright field. These micrographs show the zirconium/steel interface region of an explosive clad plate. (a) Original magnification: 50×. (b) Original magnification: 15× More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 44 Confined system for explosive forming More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 45 Unconfined system for explosive forming More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Bond zone pattern typical of explosion clad metals. Materials are type 304L stainless steel and medium-carbon steel. 20× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Schematic showing detonation regions in a nonideal explosive and the associated acceleration of the prime component More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Schematic showing key components used in the parallel gap explosive welding process More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Failure in copper-to-stainless steel tensile specimen that was explosion welded. (a) Photomicrograph of failed specimen showing wavy bond line and ductile fracture in parent copper metal. 16×. (b) Scanning electron fractograph of copper fracture showing dimpled appearance of typical More