1-20 of 668 Search Results for

Ductile brittle transition

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 35 Typical fracture toughness scatter in the ductile-brittle transition region for a carbon steel forging. Pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 C12) with test material was taken from a forged hollow cylinder normalized at 893 °C (1640 °F) for 13 h and air cooled, then austenitized at 857 °C More
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 88 Ductile-to-brittle transition in an annealed ferritic ductile iron (same alloy as in Fig. 83 and 84 ). Above demarcation line is region of dimpled rupture (the ductile fracture surface of the test sample after partial fracture at room temperature). Below line is region of quasi More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 121 Variation of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten with annealing temperature. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature determined by 4 t bend for tungsten sheet. Sources: Ref 513 , 518 , 519 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11 Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. (a) General behavior of body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) metals. (b) Effect of carbon content in ferrite-pearlite steels on Charpy V-notch transition temperature and shelf energy More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures (from tests using Charpy U-notch specimens) as a function of oxygen content for a decarburized electrolytic iron and a high-purity iron with 10 ppm C. Source: Ref 6 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of high-purity iron as a function of carbon content and oxygen content. Source: Ref 6 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 69 Schematic figure of the brittle-to-ductile fracture transition. The relative area on the fracture surface of the three microscale fracture mechanisms (stretch zone, dimple zone, and cleavage zone) are indicated. Source: Ref 78 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Effect of strain rate on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in body-centered cubic metals More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Effect of grain size on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 0.11% C mild steel. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 21 Ductile-to-brittle transition curves for a variety of materials More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 18 Change in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as a function of grain boundary impurity concentration. Data obtained on 3340 steel doped individually with 0.06% P, 0.06% Sn, or 0.06% Sb. a/o, atomic percent. 285 DPH = 890 MPa (129 ksi) ultimate strength. Source: Ref 27 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Ductile-brittle temperature transition. bcc, body-centered cubic; fcc, face-centered cubic More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) curves for two ferritic alloys. Alloy 1 has a well-defined transition temperature. Alloy 2 has a higher and less well-defined DBTT. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 17 Schematic illustration of the ductile-to-brittle transition in body-centered cubic metals More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) as a function of (C + N) content and thermal treatment. WC, water cooled More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 69 Schematic of brittle-to-ductile fracture transition. The relative area on the fracture surface of the three microscale fracture mechanisms (stretch zone, or SZ, dimple zone, and cleavage zone) are indicated. Source: Ref 78 More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Effect of strain rate on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in body-centered cubic metals More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 19 Effect of grain size on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of 0.11% C mild steel. Source: Ref 3 More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003550
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
.... It illustrates how surface degradation of a plain strain tension specimen alters the ductile brittle transition in polyethylene creep rupture. The article concludes with information on the effects of temperature on polymer performance. creep rupture ductile brittle transition environmental stress...
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Observed microscopic fracture mechanisms for different loading conditions and environments. DBTT is the ductile brittle transition temperature, and K ISCC is the stress corrosion threshold. K IHE is the hydrogen embrittlement threshold. Note 8(a): See Fig. 13 and discussions More