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Crevice corrosion

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003662
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Crevice corrosion is a form of localized corrosion that affects many alloys that normally exhibit passive behavior. This article discusses the frequently used crevice corrosion testing and evaluation procedures. These procedures include specific crevice corrosion tests, multiple...
Book Chapter

By R.G. Kelly
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003613
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Crevice corrosion involves three fundamental types of processes such as electrochemical reactions, homogeneous chemical reactions, and mass transport. This article describes the critical factors of crevice corrosion, including crevice geometry, material, environment, crevice corrosion...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Mechanism of crevice corrosion at a joint. Crevice corrosion is common at weldments or sheet metal joints (a) and can occur in apparently sealed lap joints (b). More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 21 Multiple-crevice cylinders for use in crevice corrosion testing. Source: Ref 59 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 19 Multiple-crevice cylinders for use in crevice corrosion testing. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 46 Effect of crevice gap and depth on the initiation of crevice corrosion in various stainless steels and alloy 625. The gaps and depths below and to the right of the curve for each material define crevice geometries where initiation of crevice corrosion is predicted by the mathematical More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Mechanism of pitting corrosion. As with crevice corrosion, pitting occurs in localized areas that are depleted of oxygen, low in pH, and high in chlorides. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 20 Assembled crevice corrosion test specimen. Source: Ref 59 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 16 Appearance of three specimens at the end of a weeklong crevice corrosion test in natural seawater, at room temperature, under an applied potential of 300 mV. (a) Alloy 625. Crevice formation initiated after 60 h; 3 mil crevice cut evident at end of week. Source: Ref 45 . (b More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 10 Crevice corrosion of Ti-0.3Mo-0.8Ni and grade 2 unalloyed Ti in saturated NaCl solution. Shaded band represents transition zone between active and passive behavior. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Critical crevice corrosion temperature as a function of the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) and alloy type. Crevice corrosion will not occur below the temperature indicated but will above. Tests made in 6% ferric chloride. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Severe crevice corrosion of aluminum plate under the antenna mounts resulting from the absence of sealant in the joints More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Minimum levels of chloride that cause pitting and crevice corrosion in 30 days in SO 2 -saturated chloride solutions at 80 °C (175 °F). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Typical appearance of crevice corrosion formed on MA alloy 22 when tested using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization in 1 M NaCl at 90 °C (195 °F). The grain-boundary etching appearance is typical of a hot reducing HCl solution that may be forming inside of the crevice. Specimen More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 10 Risk of pitting (solid line) and crevice corrosion (dashed line) of standard grades of stainless steel in oxygen-saturated waters with varying chloride levels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 11 Risk of pitting (solid line) and crevice corrosion (dashed line) of higher-alloyed stainless steels in oxygen-saturated waters with varying chloride levels. Dotted line is a plate heat exchanger. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 Crevice corrosion sites attacked in seawater exposure at 35 °C (95 °F) for various stainless steels having different ferric chloride critical crevice temperatures. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Assembled crevice corrosion test specimen. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Schematic showing the mechanism of crevice corrosion for titanium in aqueous chloride media More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Crevice corrosion attack of unalloyed titanium coupon surfaces within tight gasket-to-metal crevices after exposure to hot chloride brines. (a) Before cleaning. (b) After cleaning More