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Crashes

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Crash of the Wright Flyer, 1908. Courtesy of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Photo A-42555-A More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 21 Stiffener and crash absorber in Ferrari 360 and 430 Spider cars. Courtesy of Alulight and Alcoa More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 23 Aluminum foam part for front crash element of Combino city trams. Courtesy of Alulight International More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 1 Crash of the Wright Flyer, 1908. Courtesy of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Photo A-42555-A More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006530
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract Adhesive bonding is a proven technology in the manufacture of automotive assemblies, helping carmakers achieve weight reduction goals without compromising body stiffness, crash performance, and noise-vibration-handling characteristics. This article discusses the advantages...
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 24 (a) Aluminum foam part (volume: 1926 cm 3 , or 118 in. 3 ; 1250 g, or 44 oz; compression strength: ~17 MPa, or 2.5 ksi). (b) Assembled aluminum crash box for Sprinter Light Train railway vehicle. Courtesy of Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics SAS, Bratislava More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 938 Fractured bell-crank fitting of cast aluminum alloy 356.0-T6. The fitting, which was from an aircraft rear horizontal elevator, fractured in a crash. No crack origin was found. See also Fig. 939 , 940 , 941 , 942 , 943 , 944 , 945 , 946 , 947 , 948 , 949 , 950 , 951 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Fatigue cracking in an aircraft wing fitting for the F-111 Aircraft 94 that crashed in 1969. (a) and (b) Location of the left wing-pivot box fitting. The 22 mm (0.91 in.) material defect was not observed during inspection, and a fatigue crack initiated and grew for only about 0.38 mm More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Fatigue cracking in an aircraft wing fitting for the F-111 aircraft 94 that crashed in 1969. (a) and (b) Location of the left wing pivot box fitting. The 23 mm (0.91 in.) material defect was not observed during inspection, and a fatigue crack initiated and grew for only approximately More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006821
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... components. In cases in which a failure resulted in a subsequent collision or crash, there may be multiple areas of mechanical damage imparted after the time of the initial failure. Vital aircraft components and, potentially, fracture surfaces may have endured subsequent deformation or damage...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005163
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... of these advantages are: Weight reductions through reduced sheet thickness Safety improvement through high crash resistance Better appearance through elevated dent resistance Better performance through increased fatigue strength Cost reduction through reduced material use due to down-gaging Cost...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003474
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... appearance requirements, secondary structural needs (i.e., reduction of noise, vibration for harshness for structures such as body panels and hoods), high- or low-volume manufacturing and process drivers, cost, and crash safety. Secondary structural applications in many cases tend to trade off structural...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006495
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... in pasted-electrode batteries) Implants (e.g., hip components with trabecular structures) Limiting the focus to Foaminal-type metal foams, several application groups can be found: Crash-energy absorption Lightweight design Damping One of the first serial products was developed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... in alloy 365.0 according to Ref 3 : 0.13–0.19 % Mg for crash-relevant components and flanging technology. 0.18–0.28 % Mg for rigid and even crash safety components in presence of fatigue loads. 0.24–0.35 % Mg for components with high operating strength against impact stress. 0.28–0.35 % Mg...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006708
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
..., and building and construction, to name a few. Many of the alloys are used in applications where toughness and energy absorption during a crash are important. Figure 1 shows relationships of some common 6 xxx alloys. With a yield strength comparable to that of mild steel, alloy 6061 is one of the most widely...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... of this grade will have less desirable structural performance (including crash/safety) unless the gage of the steel is increased to compensate for the lack of strength. This countermeasure increases part weight and may not be an acceptable solution in today's (2006) mass-conscious environment. The narrow...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0009152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... the sensor in place and fills in the hole, creating a solid mounting for the sensor ( Ref 8 ). Fig. 7 Die plug sensor. Source: Ref 8 Displacement Sensors The primary purpose of displacement sensors is die protection, that is, to avoid die crash. Die crashes may occur due to material...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... and counterpressure casting/pressure-counterpressure casting, are equally able to provide crash-worthy products and can achieve better cavity counts than squeeze casting because metal is not injected or solidified under high pressure. However, those processes are best suited for thicker-walled parts, and semisolid...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003523
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... components with trabecular structures) Foaminal-type metal foams in particular have several applications: Crash energy absorption Lightweight design Damping A high-volume production was established with a small crash-energy-absorbing element for the safety net separating the passenger...