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Charpy impact energy

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006568
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
.... Comparison of sand cast and permanent mold. Source: Ref 4 Fig. 2 Variation of Charpy impact energy in A356-T6 castings as a function of solution time. Sand castings: A, unmodified; B, strontium-modified. Metallic mold castings: C, unmodified; D, strontium-modified. Source Ref 2 Abstract...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000624
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
...-12Ni-0.5Ti alloy intended for use at cryogenic temperatures. The series shows the effect on Charpy impact energy at −196 °C (−321 °F), and on fracture-surface characteristics, of the temperature of aging after austenitizing at 900 °C (1650 °F) for 2 h and air cooling.) Fig. 1208 This SEM...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... materials by explaining the ductile-to-brittle fracture transition and by correlating KId, KIc, and Charpy V-notch impact energy absorptions. It highlights the effects of constraint, temperature, and loading rate on the fracture transition. The article discusses the applications of fracture mechanism...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... temperatures, the ferrite phase behaves in a ductile manner, so the welds are resistant to fracture. Fig. 6 Charpy impact energy vs. test temperature for type 308 welds showing the ductile-brittle transition temperature phenomena. SMA, shielded-metal arc; SA, submerged arc; GTA, gas-tungsten arc. Half...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
.... It was then discovered that a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature could be determined by impact testing using test specimens of uniform configuration and standardized notches. Such specimens were tested at a series of decreasing temperatures, and the energy absorbed in producing the fracture was noted. The Charpy...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... steels Table 2 Mechanical properties of iron and carbon steels Minimum values Typical values Material designation code Minimum strength, ksi Tensile properties Elastic constants Unnotched Charpy impact energy, ft · lbf Transverse rupture strength, ksi Compressive yield strength (0.1...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002380
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... irons. Source: Ref 2 Impact Properties While SG iron exhibits substantially greater toughness at low pearlite contents, pearlitic CG irons have impact strengths equivalent to those of SG irons ( Fig. 13 ). Charpy impact energy measurements at 21 °C (70 °F) and −41 °C (−42 °F) showed that CG...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006076
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
...-infiltrated iron and steel Typical properties Tensile properties Elastic constants Unnotched Charpy impact energy Transverse rupture strength 0.1% compressive yield strength Fatigue limit 90% survival Material designation code (a) Minimum strength (c) Ultimate strength 0.2% yield...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001477
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of the earliest tests developed to study the fracture behavior of steel. The most widely used impact test, as of the early 1990s, is the Charpy impact test, the results of which are most useful when presented as a plot of absorbed energy or percentage shear fracture against test temperature ( Fig. 1 ). Fig...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001040
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... in the Charpy-type impact tester by a single blow of a freely swinging pendulum. Upon the breaking of the Charpy specimen, three criteria are commonly measured. The loss of energy in the pendulum swing provides the energy in terms of joules (foot-pounds of force) absorbed in breaking the specimen. The fracture...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005325
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... substantially greater toughness at low pearlite contents, pearlitic CG irons have impact strengths equivalent to those of SG irons ( Fig. 21 ). Charpy impact energy measurements at 21 °C (70 °F) and −41 °C (−42 °F) have shown that CG irons produced from an SG- based iron absorbed greater energy than those made...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005994
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... resulting from fracture ( Ref 43 ). Figure 27 shows the influence of vanadium on proof stress and Charpy impact energy. Typical example steels used for fracture splitting connecting rods Table 6 Typical example steels used for fracture splitting connecting rods Steel Composition, % Ref C...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006390
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... required for crack propagation, resulting in relatively lower impact energies for cast versus HIPed material ( Fig. 4 ). Fig. 4 Unnotched Charpy impact energy versus Vickers macrohardness of selected cobalt-base alloys using 10 by 10 by 55 mm (0.4 by 0.4 by 2.2 in.) alloy samples. HIP, manufactured...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001004
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... and (b) in compression for pearlitic FG, CG, and SG irons. Source: Ref 6 While SG iron exhibits substantially greater toughness at low pearlite contents, pearlitic CG irons have impact strengths equivalent to those of SG irons ( Fig. 17 ). Charpy impact energy measurements at 21 °C (70 °F...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006344
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006345
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... of various industry and international standards Table 1 Ductile iron properties of various industry and international standards Grade Tensile strength 0.2% offset yield strength Elongation (min), % Impact energy (a) Hardness, HB Structure Mean Individual MPa ksi MPa ksi J ft...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001022
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... of a third-generation microalloy forging steel, which consists of lath martensite and uniformly distributed auto-tempered carbides Fig. 8 Bar graph showing that direct-quenched third-generation steels absorb much more energy in Charpy V-notch impact testing at −30 °C (−20 °F) than earlier...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005960
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...) 1896 (275.0) 2165 (314.0) 1723 (249.9) 1942 (281.6) 2319 (336.4) 1117 (162.0) 1203 (174.5) Elongation, % 16.0 14.0 14.5 11.0 10.7 8.6 6.1 12.5 8.5 Reduction in area, % 67.0 64.0 63.0 55.0 51.1 40.8 22.2 52.0 17.5 Charpy V-notch impact energy, J (ft × lbf) 47.5 (35.0...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... damage to a solid surface due to relative motion between that surface and one or more contacting substances and generally consists of a progressive loss of material from the wearing surface. It may include oxidation, corrosion, creep, fatigue, frictional effects, battering from impact, pseudomachining...