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Carbonitriding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005811
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... Abstract Carburization is the process of intentionally increasing the carbon content of a steel surface so that a hardened case can be produced by martensitic transformation during quenching. Like carburizing, carbonitriding involves heating above the upper critical temperature to austenitize...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005762
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... Abstract Carbonitriding is a modified form of carburizing that involves the introduction and diffusion of atomic nitrogen into the surface steel during carburization. This article discusses the composition, depth, and hardenability of a carburized case, and demonstrates how to control...
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 44 Deep case hardening combining carburizing and carbonitriding/nitriding. Source: Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 13 Effects of temperature and of duration of carbonitriding on effective case depth. Both sets of data were obtained in the same plant. Note that upper graph (for 1020 steel) is in terms of total furnace time, whereas bottom graph (for 1112 steel) is for 15 min at temperature. More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 18 Effect of porosity on carbonitriding. Compacts of F-0000 powder were pressed and sintered to various densities, then carbonitrided. Hardness traverses reflect both depth of carbonitrided case and density of compacts. Hardness traverse for a carbonitrided specimen of wrought 1018 steel More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Effect of carbonitriding to increase retained austenite on rolling-contact fatigue. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Effect of porosity on carbonitriding. Compacts of F-0000 powder were pressed and sintered to various densities, then carbonitrided. Hardness traverses reflect both depth of carbonitrided case and density of compacts. Hardness traverse for a carbonitrided specimen of wrought 1018 steel More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11 Effects of temperature and of duration of carbonitriding on effective case depth. Both sets of data were obtained in the same plant. Note that the graph in (a) (for 1020 steel) is in terms of total furnace time, whereas the graph in (b) (for 1112 steel) is for 15 min at temperature. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 16 Effect of ammonia content of carbonitriding gas on hardness gradient More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 23 Effect of carbonitriding temperature on dimensional stability of three 1010 steel production parts. Parts were carbonitrided to produce a case depth of 0.13 to 0.20 mm (0.005 to 0.008 in.) with minimum surface hardness of 89 HR15N. Gas ratios and dewpoints were essentially the same More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 7 Depth of carbonitrided cases as a function of boosting time and temperature More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 43 Improvement in rolling contact-fatigue life of various carbonitrided materials in (a) clean and (b) contaminated environments. Source: Ref 50 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 10 Wear characteristics of carburized, carbonitrided, nitrocarburized, and untreated 0.2% C steel. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 24 Preferred compositions of titanium carbonitride cermets. M, molybdenum and/or tungsten; z , number of moles carbon and nitrogen divided by the number of moles titanium and M; z is variable between the limits 0.80 and 1.07. Source: Ref 64 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 25 Microstructure (at 1500×) of a typical spinodal titanium carbonitride cermet. The manufacturing process, called spinodal decomposition, minimizes grain growth and consistently produces nonporous material. Courtesy of Teledyne-Firth-Sterling More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 26 Schematic of the microstructure of a titanium carbonitride cermet More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 26 Carbonitrided and oil-quenched 1117 steel with a surface layer of decarburized ferrite (left) superimposed on a normal case structure of martensite. The core (right) contains patches of ferrite (white). Nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 28 Case microstructure of 1010 steel, carbonitrided at 790 °C (1450 °F) and oil quenched. The high-carbon case (left) is similar to that in Fig. 27 , but the core (right) is predominantly ferrite. Nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 29 Effect of low-temperature hold on retained austenite in carbonitrided 8617 steel bar. (a) Carbonitrided 4 h at 845 °C (1550 °F) in 8% ammonia, 8% propane, and remainder endothermic gas. Oil quenched and tempered 1.5 h at 150 °C (300 °F). Structure is tempered martensite (dark More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 8 Manganese sulfide (dark gray, rounded) and titanium carbonitride (light gray, angular) inclusions. Etched using 2% nital. 500× More