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Cadmium plating

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001247
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... of cadmium plating with attention to the materials of construction and equipment used. The article provides a description of the selection of plating method with examples, applications, and several postplating processes of cadmium plating. anode system bath temperature brighteners cadmium plating...
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 2 Schematic showing cadmium plating installation that incorporates the barrel method More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 3 Schematic showing process sequence for automatic cadmium plating installation More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 4 Flow diagram showing cadmium plating operation relative to overall cleaning and post-treatment operations for steel and cast iron components Solution No. Composition Amount Temperature Immersion time °C °F 1 H 2 SO 4 8–12 vol% 71-93 160-200 10–120 s 2 HCl More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 7 Application of shields to obtain shim having a uniform cadmium plating. The 305 mm (12 in.) long and 38 mm (1 in.) wide shim was plated to the required thickness of 13 ± 5 μm (520 ± 200 μin.). More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 10 Thickness distribution for cadmium plating of 90 samples that were evaluated from a 5000-piece production lot More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 8 Couplings that were uniformly cadmium plated with the aid of a 6.4 mm ( 1 4 in.) diameter anode centered in the bore during the plating operation. Plating thickness ranges from 8 to 13 μm (320 to 520 μin.). More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 steel nut that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. Failure occurred seven days after installation on an aircraft wing structure. See also Fig. 2. 5×. Courtesy of Lockheed-Georgia Company More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Fracture surface of failed cadmium-plated nut in Fig. 1 . (a) Macrograph of fracture surface; 15×. (b) Scanning electron micrograph of the area in the box in (a) showing typical intergranular fracture; 3950×. Courtesy of Lockheed-Georgia Company More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Service failure of a low-alloy steel nut by LMIE. Cadmium-plated, 4140 low-alloy steel (44 HRC) nuts were inadvertently used on bolts for clamps used to join ducts that carried hot (500 °C, or 930 °F) air from the compressor of a military jet engine. (a) The nuts were fragmented More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Failed Ti-6AI-4V shear fastener. The fasteners were cadmium plated for galvanic compatibility with the aluminum structure. (a) Photograph showing failure at the head-to-shank fillet. (b) Intergranular fracture morphology. Failure was attributed to LMIE caused by excessive temperature More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Cadmium-plated 8740 steel aircraft-wing assembly nut that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. The nut was not baked after electroplating to release hydrogen. (a) Overall view. 5×. (b) Fracture surface. 9×. (c) Scanning electron micrograph of typical intergranular fracture shown in box More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Cadmium-plated alloy steel self-retaining bolts that fractured because of hydrogen damage. (a) Fractured and unused intact bolt. (b) Fractured bolt; brittle fracture surface is indicated by A and B. (c) and (d) Electron fractographs of surfaces A and B, respectively, showing brittle More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 15 . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Cadmium-plated 4140 steel nuts from a military jet engine that failed by LME. (a) Fragmented and cracked nuts. (b) Typical fracture surface. (c) Electron fractograph showing brittle intergranular fracture More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 4 Embrittlement behavior of cadmium-plated 4340 steel. Specimens were tested in delayed failure at 300 °C (570 °F) and unplated steel in air at 300 °C (570 °F). Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 5 Embrittlement behavior of cadmium-plated 4340 steel. Specimens were tested in delayed failure at temperatures ranging from 360 to 230 °C (680 to 445 °F). Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 12 Cadmium-plated 8740 steel aircraft-wing assembly nut that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. The nut was not baked after electroplating to release hydrogen. (a) Overall view. Original magnification: 5×. (b) Fracture surface. Original magnification: 9×. (c) Scanning electron micrograph More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 13 Cadmium-plated alloy steel self-retaining bolts that fractured because of hydrogen damage. (a) Fractured and unused intact bolt. (b) Fractured bolt; brittle fracture surface is indicated by A and B. (c) and (d) Electron fractographs of surfaces A and B, respectively, showing brittle More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 14 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 15 . More