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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article provides a detailed discussion on the various devices by which cathodic protection (CP) can be applied to pipe-type power transmission cables. These devices include the resistor rectifier, isolator-surge protector, polarization cells, and field rectifiers. The article...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 26 Four types of terminals that can be attached to cables by rotary swaging. (a) Ball swaged in position. (b) Ball with single shank. (c) Ball with double shank. (d) Shank terminal before swaging. (e) Shank terminal after swaging More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the classification system of coppers for conductors and for wires and cables, as well as wire rod fabrication techniques such as rolling and continuous casting. Wiredrawing and wire stranding operations, including the preparation of rod surface...
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 2 Schematic illustrations of (a) cable swaging and (b) cable termination More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Cable-stayed bridges. (a) Veterans' Memorial Bridge, Weirton, WV. Courtesy of KTA-Tator, Inc. (b) Normandy Bridge over the Seine River near Le Havre, France. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 10 Copper-bearing lead (0.04 to 0.08% Cu); cross section of cable sheath with 2.7 mm (0.105 in.) wall thickness. The grains contain lead-copper eutectic, which forms at a copper content of 0.06%. (NH 4 ) 2 MoO 4 , then acetic-nitric acid. Original magnification 10× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 11 Copper-bearing lead (0.15% Cu); section through wall of cable sheath showing intergranular cracks (black areas in center) that resulted from creep. (NH 4 ) 2 MoO 4 , then acetic-nitric acid. Original magnification 75× More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 2 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum shielding in buried telephone cable coupled to buried copper plates. Courtesy of R. Baboian, Texas Instruments, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 3 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum in buried power cable splice (copper to aluminum). Courtesy of R. Baboian, Texas Instruments, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 32 Unpainted cable and telephone boxes manufactured by SMC compression molding. The boxes, exposed to the weather for 25 years, are shown next to an old painted telephone booth. More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 12 Artist's rendition of the Interstate 5/Gilman Drive cable-stayed bridge More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Typical cable drip loop to prevent water entry into a hollow mast More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 19 Aluminum conductor composite-reinforced cable specimen. Note the seven inner Al 2 O 3 /Al metal-matrix composite (MMC) core wires More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 19 The electrical cable support became loose following several years of service. The maintenance engineer discovered gross thinning of the carbon steel screw. Other supports were completely detached. The shielded area around the fastener favored crevice corrosion. Stray current from More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 38 Methods of using cable for applying magnetizing circuits to large forgings and castings. For the forging in (a), circuits 1 and 3 are head shots, and circuit 2 is a cable wrap. For the casting in (b), circuits 1 and 3 are central conductors, and circuit 2 is a cable wrap. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 42 Disk on a through shaft in which the shaft was cable wrapped to produce a longitudinal magnetic field in the shaft and a radial field in the disk. Using the shaft as a central conductor produced a circular magnetic field in both the shaft and the disk. More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 9 Fiber-optic inspection with illumination around head. Note cable reel with monitor in background. Courtesy of KTA-Tator, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Fatigue fracture of a steel 8 × 19 elevator cable. The fracture resulted from cyclic torsional and tensile stresses. (a) Conical shape at end of cable, and end of broken cable. (b) As-received 1.2-mm-diam wire. 25×. (c) Same wire after cleaning with a cold aqueous solution of 10% HCl More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Fiber optic cable connector. Courtesy of IPG Photonics More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 5 Fatigue strengths of two cable-sheathing lead alloys in bending. Bending was at 25 °C (77 °F), one cycle per minute. More