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Brinell hardness

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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 10 Tensile properties as a function of Brinell hardness of steels. (a) Tensile properties in several quenched and tempered steels. (b) Relation of tensile strength and reduction in area for carbon and alloy steels. More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 2 Analog Brinell hardness tester More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Hydraulic, manually operated portable Brinell hardness tester More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 14 Computerized Brinell hardness testing optical scanning system More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 17 Automatic Brinell hardness tester with digital readout. Courtesy of NewAge Industries More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 18 Hydraulic, manually operated portable Brinell hardness tester More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 19 Pin Brinell hardness tester. (a) Clamp loading tester. (b) Schematic of pin Brinell principle More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 20 Proving rings used for calibrating Brinell hardness testers More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 3 Shear stress variation with Brinell hardness for ferrous and nonferrous metals. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 25 Influence of tempering temperature on Brinell hardness of five oil-quenched unalloyed and alloyed gray irons for 1 h tempering. Composition of irons given in table. Source: Ref 62 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 8 Tensile strength relationship to Brinell hardness for annealed gray iron is influenced by the shape of graphite. Iron cast in sand has mainly type A graphite, while permanent mold castings have type D graphite. The SAE minimum is shown for comparison. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 Relationship between tensile strength and Brinell hardness for a series of inoculated gray irons from a single foundry. Open circles represent unalloyed gray iron, and closed circles represent alloyed gray iron. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 8 Relationship between tensile strength and Brinell hardness for a series of inoculated gray irons from a single foundry. Open circles represent unalloyed gray iron, and closed circles represent alloy gray iron. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 10 Relationships of tensile properties to Brinell hardness for pearlitic malleable irons from two foundries. The mechanical properties of these irons vary in a substantially linear relationship with Brinell hardness, and in the low-hardness ranges (below about 207 HB), the properties More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 12 Influence of tempering temperature on Brinell hardness of five oil-quenched unalloyed and alloyed gray irons for 1 h tempering. Composition of irons given in table. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 5 Tensile strength relationship to Brinell hardness for annealed gray iron is influenced by the shape of graphite. Iron cast in sand has mainly type A graphite, while permanent mold castings have type D graphite. The SAE International minimum is shown for comparison. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 20 Brinell hardness versus fatigue limit for ductile iron shows data scatter that makes a prediction of fatigue unreliable. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 6 Relationships of tensile properties to Brinell hardness for pearlitic malleable irons from two foundries. The mechanical properties of these irons vary in a substantially linear relationship with Brinell hardness, and in the low-hardness ranges (below approximately 207 HB More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 41 Effect of temperature on Brinell hardness. Source: Ref 68 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 2 Relation between Brinell hardness and strength and elongation for some standard-grade ductile cast irons More